Before Starting the CoCApplication

 

The CoC Consolidated Application is made up of two parts:  the CoC Application and the CoC Priority Listing, with all of the CoC’s project applications either approved and ranked, or rejected. The Collaborative Applicant is responsible for submitting both the CoC Application and the CoC Priority Listing in order for the CoC Consolidated Application to be considered complete.

The Collaborative Applicant is responsible for:

-  Reviewing the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA in its entirety for specific applicationand program requirements.

FY2016 CoC Application

Page 1

09/13/2016

Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC

ND-500

Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal

COC_REG_2016_135770

- 


Using the CoC Application Detailed Instructions while completing the application in e-snaps.

 

-  Answering all questions in the CoC application.  It is the responsibility of the CollaborativeApplicant to ensure that all imported and new responses in all parts of the application are fully reviewed and completed. When doing this keep in mind:

-  This year, CoCs will see that a few responses have been imported from the FY 2015 CoCApplication.

-  For some of the questions HUD has provided documents to assist Collaborative Applicants incompleting responses.

-  For other questions, the Collaborative Applicant must be aware of responses provided byproject applications in their Project Applications.

-  Some questions require the Collaborative Applicant to attach a document to receive credit.This will be identified in the question.

-  All questions marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory and must be completed in order tosubmit the CoC Application.

   For CoC Application Detailed Instructions click here.

1A. Continuum of Care (CoC) Identification

 

Instructions:

For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program CompetitionNOFA.  Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.

FY2016 CoC Application

Page 2

09/13/2016

Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC

ND-500

Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal

COC_REG_2016_135770


1A-1. CoC Name and Number: ND-500 - North Dakota Statewide CoC

 

1A-2. Collaborative Applicant Name: North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People

1A-3. CoC Designation: CA

1A-4. HMIS Lead: North Dakota Coalition f

Before Starting the CoC  Application
The CoC Consolidated Application is made up of two parts:  the CoC Application and the CoC Priority Listing, with all of the CoC’s project applications either approved and ranked, or rejected. The Collaborative Applicant is responsible for submitting both the CoC Application and the CoC Priority Listing in order for the CoC Consolidated Application to be considered complete.
The Collaborative Applicant is responsible for:
-    Reviewing the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA in its entirety for specific applicationand program requirements.
-    Using the CoC Application Detailed Instructions while completing the application in e-snaps.
-    Answering all questions in the CoC application.  It is the responsibility of the CollaborativeApplicant to ensure that all imported and new responses in all parts of the application are fully reviewed and completed. When doing this keep in mind:
-    This year, CoCs will see that a few responses have been imported from the FY 2015 CoCApplication.
-    For some of the questions HUD has provided documents to assist Collaborative Applicants incompleting responses.
-    For other questions, the Collaborative Applicant must be aware of responses provided byproject applications in their Project Applications.
-    Some questions require the Collaborative Applicant to attach a document to receive credit.This will be identified in the question.
-    All questions marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory and must be completed in order tosubmit the CoC Application.
   For CoC Application Detailed Instructions click here.
1A. Continuum of Care (CoC) Identification
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition  NOFA.  Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1A-1. CoC Name and Number: ND-500 - North Dakota Statewide CoC
1A-2. Collaborative Applicant Name: North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People
1A-3. CoC Designation: CA
1A-4. HMIS Lead: North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People
1B. Continuum of Care (CoC) Engagement
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1B-1. From the list below, select those organizations and persons  that participate in CoC meetings.
Then select "Yes" or "No" to indicate if CoC meeting participants are voting members or if they sit on the CoC Board.
Only select "Not Applicable" if the organization or person does not exist in the CoC's geographic area.
Organization/Person Categories    Participates  in CoC
 Meetings    Votes, including  electing
 CoC Board    Sits on
CoC Board
Local Government Staff/Officials    Yes    Yes    No
CDBG/HOME/ESG Entitlement Jurisdiction    Yes    Yes    Yes
Law Enforcement    Yes    Yes    No
Local Jail(s)    No    No    No
Hospital(s)    No    No    No
EMT/Crisis Response Team(s)    No    No    No
Mental Health Service Organizations    Yes    Yes    Yes
Substance Abuse Service Organizations    Yes    Yes    No
Affordable Housing Developer(s)    Yes    Yes    Yes
Public Housing Authorities    Yes    Yes    No
CoC Funded Youth Homeless Organizations    Yes    Yes    Yes
Non-CoC Funded Youth Homeless Organizations    Yes    Yes    Yes
School Administrators/Homeless Liaisons    Yes    Yes    No
CoC Funded Victim Service Providers    Yes    Yes    Yes
Non-CoC Funded Victim Service Providers    Yes    Yes    No
Street Outreach Team(s)    Not Applicable        Not Applicable
Youth advocates    Yes    Yes    Yes
Agencies that serve survivors of human trafficking    Yes    Yes    Yes
Other homeless subpopulation advocates    Not Applicable        Not Applicable
Homeless or Formerly Homeless Persons    Yes    Yes    Yes
        No    Not Applicable
        No    Not Applicable
        No    Not Applicable
Applicant must select Yes, No or Not Applicable for all of the listed organization/person categories in 1B-1.
1B-1a. Describe in detail how the CoC solicits and considers the full range of opinions from individuals or organizations with knowledge of homelessness or an interest in preventing and ending homelessness in the geographic area. Please provide two examples of organizations or individuals from the list in 1B-1 to answer this question.
CoC membership is open to all who wish to participate. Each entity has a vote in general membership meetings, on committees and for the governing board. Membership represents a broad spectrum of service provision and interest in homelessness and, consequently, a broad arena of expertise. The CoC's membership committee works to identify and approach stakeholders who are not at the table. When specific expertise is needed, the appropriate entities are engaged. For example, the CoC has several CoC funded DV service providers. When the need to develop coordinated assessment arose, the CoC reached out to the Council on Abused Women's Services, which represents all DV providers in the state to serve on the governing body of the Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System.
1B-1b. List Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY)-funded and other youth homeless assistance providers (CoC Program and non-CoC Program funded) who operate within the CoC's geographic area. Then select "Yes" or "No" to indicate if each provider is a voting member or sits on the CoC Board.
    Youth Service Provider  (up to 10)    RHY Funded?    Participated as a
Voting Member in at least two CoC
Meetings between July 1, 2015 and June 20, 2016.    Sat on CoC Board as active member or official at any point between
July 1, 2015 and June 20, 2016.
Youthworks        Yes    Yes    Yes
Fraser LTD        No    Yes    Yes
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
NA        No    No    No
1B-1c. List the victim service providers (CoC Program and non-CoC Program funded) who operate within the CoC's geographic area.
Then select "Yes" or "No" to indicate if each provider is a voting member or sits on the CoC Board.
Victim Service Provider for Survivors of Domestic Violence
(up to 10)     Participated as a
Voting Member in at least two CoC
Meetings between
July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016    Sat on CoC Board as active member or
official at any point
between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016.
Community Violence Intervention Center    Yes    Yes
Abused Adult Resource Center    Yes    Yes
Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Center    Yes    Yes
YWCA Cass/Clay    Yes    Yes
NA    No    No
NA    No    No
NA    No    No
NA    No    No
NA    No    No
NA    No    No
1B-2. Explain how the CoC is open to proposals from entities that have not previously received funds in prior CoC Program competitions, even if the CoC is not applying for new projects in 2016. (limit 1000 characters)
The CoC actively recruits proposals from new entities, particularly in the western part of the state where capacity has not been able to keep pace with increased demand. This year the CoC reached out to YouthWorks and requested that they consider submitting an application. Public announcements are also made via social media and in a variety of public meetings.
1B-3. How often does the CoC invite new Quarterly members to join the CoC through a publicly available invitation?
1C. Continuum of Care (CoC) Coordination
 
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1C-1. Does the CoC coordinate with Federal, State, Local, private and other entities serving homeless individuals and families and those at risk of homelessness in the planning, operation and funding of projects?
Only select "Not Applicable" if the funding source does not exist within the CoC's geographic area.
Funding or Program Source    Coordinates with Planning,
Operation and Funding of Projects
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)    Yes
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)    No
Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY)    Yes
Head Start Program    No
Housing and service programs funded through Federal, State and local government resources.    Yes
1C-2. The McKinney-Vento Act, requires CoC's to participate in the
Consolidated Plan(s) (Con Plan(s)) for the geographic area served by the
CoC.  The CoC Program Interim rule at 24 CFR 578.7 (c) (4) requires the
CoC to provide information required to complete the Con Plan(s) within the CoC's geographic area, and 24 CFR 91.100(a)(2)(i) and 24 CFR 91.110
(b)(2) requires the State and local Con Plan jurisdiction(s) consult with the
CoC.  The following chart asks for the information about CoC and Con Plan jurisdiction coordination, as well as CoC and ESG recipient coordination.
CoCs can use the CoCs and Consolidated Plan Jurisdiction Crosswalk to assist in answering this question.
    Number    
Number of Con Plan jurisdictions with whom the CoC geography overlaps        4
How many Con Plan jurisdictions did the CoC participate with in their Con Plan development process?        4
How many Con Plan jurisdictions did the CoC provide with Con Plan jurisdiction level PIT data?        1
How many of the Con Plan jurisdictions are also ESG recipients?        1
How many ESG recipients did the CoC participate with to make ESG funding decisions?        1
How many ESG recipients did the CoC consult with in the development of ESG performance standards and evaluation process for ESG funded activities?        1
1C-2a. Based on the responses provided in 1C-2, describe in greater detail how the CoC participates with the Consolidated Plan jurisdiction(s) located in the CoC's geographic area and include the frequency and type of interactions between the CoC and the Consolidated Plan jurisdiction(s).
(limit 1000 characters)
The CoC participates in stakeholder meetings when called by the Consolidated Plan jurisdictions and publicizes those meetings to CoC membership. The CoC coordinator consults directly with the Department of Commerce and Grand Forks, Fargo and Bismarck planning offices to inform their Consolidated Plans and amendments.
1C-2b. Based on the response in 1C-2, describe how the CoC is working with ESG recipients to determine local ESG funding decisions and how the CoC assists in the development of performance standards and evaluation of outcomes for ESG-funded activities. (limit 1000 characters)
The ESG recipient for ND is the ND Department of Commerce, Division of Community Services. ND-DoC DCS is an active participant in the CoC.
Standards are set at the general CoC membership meetings. The CoC Monitoring and Evaluation Committee reviews program outcomes of ESG subrecipients and the monitoring results from ND DoC-DCS. Program outcomes and monitoring results inform funding awards.
1C-3. Describe how the CoC coordinates with victim service providers and non-victim service providers (CoC Program funded and non-CoC funded) to ensure that survivors of domestic violence are provided housing and services that provide and maintain safety and security.  Responses must address how the service providers ensure and maintain the safety and security of participants and how client choice is upheld. (limit 1000 characters)
The Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System (CARES) screens for Domestic Violence at the beginning of the assessment, and all DV victims are immediately referred to the victim service provider nearest them. ND's DV providers have a well integrated network that extends across the upper Midwest and will allow victims to access any of the providers in the state or out of state that the victim feels best suits their needs. Victims accessing services outside the DV provider network are entered into HMIS anonymously and only with the client's approval. Victim service providers frequently refer clients to services outside of their network and the CoC works diligently to assure equal access to services for all. DV providers work to obtain protection orders on behalf of clients and keep the location of the clients confidential.
1C-4. List each of the Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) within the CoC's geographic area. If there are more than 5 PHAs within the CoC’s geographic area, list the 5 largest PHAs. For each PHA, provide the percentage of new admissions that were homeless at the time of
admission between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 and indicate whether the PHA has a homeless admissions preference in its Public Housing and/or Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program.
Public Housing Agency Name    % New Admissions into Public Housing and
Housing Choice Voucher Program from 7/1/15 to 6/30/16 who were homeless at entry    PHA has General or
Limited Homeless Preference
Fargo Housing and Redevelopment Authority    47.00%    Yes-Both
Grand Forks Housing Authority    7.00%    Yes-Both
Burleigh County Housing Authority    0.00%    No
Cass County Housing    0.00%    No
Stutsman Counting Housing Authority    0.00%    No
If you select "Yes--Public Housing," "Yes--HCV," or "Yes--Both" for "PHA has general or limited homeless preference," you must attach
documentation of the preference from the PHA in order to receive credit.
1C-5. Other than CoC, ESG, Housing Choice Voucher Programs and Public Housing, describe other subsidized or low-income housing opportunities that exist within the CoC that target persons experiencing homelessness.
(limit 1000 characters)
The most significant low income housing opportunity in the CoC is the state's Housing Incentive Fund which is a one for one tax credit program that has provided over 90 million dollars which has been leveraged into approximately a half a billion dollars of housing development. Most projects are mixed use with market rate units helping to subsidize low income. Low Income Housing Tax Credit projects also provide low income housing and the CoC writes several letters of support and provides data to support several projects each year.
1C-6. Select the specific strategies implemented by the CoC to ensure that homelessness is not criminalized in the CoC's geographic area.  Select all that apply.
Engaged/educated local policymakers:    
X

Engaged/educated law enforcement:    
X

Implemented communitywide plans:     
No strategies have been implemented     
Other:(limit 1000 characters)    
     

     
     

1D. Continuum of Care (CoC) Discharge Planning
 
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1D-1. Select the system(s) of care within the CoC's geographic area for which there is a discharge policy in place that is mandated by the State, the CoC, or another entity for the following institutions? Check all that apply.
Foster Care:    
X

Health Care:    
X

Mental Health Care:    
X

Correctional Facilities:    
X

None:     
1D-2. Select the system(s) of care within the CoC's geographic area with which the CoC actively coordinates with to ensure institutionalized
persons that have resided in each system of care for longer than 90 days are not discharged into homelessness. Check all that apply.
Foster Care:    
X

Health Care:    
X

Mental Health Care:    
X

Correctional Facilities:    
X

None:     
1D-2a. If the applicant did not check all boxes in 1D-2, explain why there is no coordination with the institution(s) that were not selected and explain how the CoC plans to coordinate with the institution(s) to ensure persons
 

discharged are not discharged into homelessness. (limit 1000 characters)
N/A        
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 11    09/14/2016
1E. Centralized or Coordinated Assessment (Coordinated Entry)
 
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
The CoC Program Interim Rule requires CoCs to establish a Centralized or
Coordinated Assessment System which HUD refers to as the Coordinated Entry Process. Based on the recent Coordinated Entry Policy Brief, HUD's primary goals for the coordinated entry process are that assistance be allocated as effectively as possible and that it be easily accessible no matter where or how people present for assistance.
    Participate    Makes
Referrals    Receives Referrals    Operates Access            
FY2016 CoC Application            Page 12            09/14/2016
1E-1. Explain how the CoC's coordinated entry process is designed to identify, engage, and assist homeless individuals and families that will ensure those who request or need assistance are connected to proper housing and services. (limit 1000 characters)
Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System (CARES) uses a diversion tool which ensures the most vulnerable receive available shelter beds. Those who do not receive shelter are referred to other interventions based on responses to the diversion questions. The VI-SPDAT is used to prioritize individuals for housing placements. The full SPDAT is used as a case management tool. CARES is still exploring options to add a phone system like 211 or other, and has implemented housing navigators in its largest community which may be replicated in other areas. CARES is very close to finishing a data bridge between the ND CoC and WC MN CoC to help coordinate CARES across the MN/ND border. The coordination currently exists using a manual spreadsheet.
1E-2. CoC Program and ESG Program funded projects are required to participate in the coordinated entry process, but there are many other
organizations and individuals who may participate but are not required to do so. From the following list, for each type of organization or individual,
select all of the applicable checkboxes that indicate how that organization or individual participates in the CoC's coordinated entry process. If there
are other organizations or persons who participate but are not on this list, enter the information in the blank text box, click "Save" at the bottom of the screen, and then select the applicable checkboxes.

Organization/Person Categories    s in
Ongoing
Planning and
Evaluation    to the
Coordinate d Entry
Process    from the
Coordinate d Entry
Process    Point for
Coordinate d Entry
Process    Participate s in Case
Conferenci ng    Does not Participate    Does not Exist
Local Government Staff/Officials    
X
                              
CDBG/HOME/Entitlement Jurisdiction    
X
                              
Law Enforcement                             
X
     
Local Jail(s)                             
X
     
Hospital(s)                             
X
     
EMT/Crisis Response Team(s)                             
X
     
Mental Health Service Organizations    
X
    
X
    
X
         
X
          
Substance Abuse Service Organizations    
X
    
X
    
X
                    
Affordable Housing Developer(s)                             
X
     
Public Housing Authorities    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
          
Non-CoC Funded Youth Homeless Organizations    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
          
School Administrators/Homeless Liaisons         
X
    
X
                    
Non-CoC Funded Victim Service Organizations    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
    
X
          
Street Outreach Team(s)                             
X
     
Homeless or Formerly Homeless Persons    
X
                              
                                   
                                   
                                   
 
1F. Continuum of Care (CoC) Project Review, Ranking, and Selection
 
Instructions
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1F-1. For all renewal project applications submitted in the FY 2016 CoC
Program Competition complete the chart below regarding the CoC’s review of the Annual Performance Report(s).
How many renewal project applications were submitted in the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition?        18
How many of the renewal project applications are first time renewals for which the first operating year has not expired yet?        1
How many renewal project application APRs were reviewed by the CoC as part of the local CoC competition project review, ranking, and selection process for the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition?        17
Percentage of APRs submitted by renewing projects within the CoC that were reviewed by the CoC in the 2016 CoC Competition?        100.00%
1F-2 - In the sections below, check the appropriate box(es) for each selection to indicate how project applications were reviewed and ranked
for the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition. Written documentation of the
CoC's publicly announced Rating and Review procedure must be attached.
Performance outcomes from APR reports/HMIS:    
     % permanent housing exit destinations    
X

     % increases in income    
X

    
Monitoring criteria:    
     Utilization rates    
X

     Drawdown rates     
     Frequency or Amount of Funds Recaptured by HUD    
X

Need for specialized population services:
     Youth    
X

     Victims of Domestic Violence    
X

     Families with Children    
X

     Persons Experiencing Chronic Homelessness    
X

     Veterans    
X

None:     
1F-2a. Describe how the CoC considered the severity of needs and vulnerabilities of participants that are, or will be, served by the project applications when determining project application priority.
 (limit 1000 characters)
Despite having a drop in homelessness in the last year, capacity has not kept pace with the increase in demand for services, so all needs and vulnerabilities are under-served. The CoC has prioritized a Housing First model with emphasis on youth and family homelessness, as we are achieving success with the goal of ending veteran's homelessness. We are also trying to emphasize the importance of the VI-SPDAT model to triage the acuity of need.
1F-3. Describe how the CoC made the local competition review, ranking, and selection criteria publicly available, and identify the public medium(s) used and the date(s) of posting. Evidence of the public posting must be attached.
(limit 750 characters)
The information was posted on our website and emailed to stakeholders.
1F-4.  On what date did the CoC and 09/11/2016
Collaborative Applicant publicly post all parts of the FY 2016 CoC Consolidated Application that included the final project application ranking?  (Written documentation of the public posting, with the date of the posting clearly visible, must be attached.  In addition, evidence of communicating decisions to the CoC's full membership must be attached).
Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC    ND-500
Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal        COC_REG_2016_135770
1F-5.  Did the CoC use the reallocation process in the FY 2016 CoC Program
Competition to reduce or reject projects for the creation of new projects?  (If the CoC utilized the reallocation process, evidence of the public posting of the reallocation process must be attached.)
1F-5a. If the CoC rejected project
application(s), on what date did the CoC and Collaborative Applicant notify those project applicants that their project application was rejected? (If project applications were rejected, a copy of the written notification to each project applicant must be attached.)
1F-6. In the Annual Renewal Demand (ARD) is the CoC's FY 2016 CoC's FY 2016 Priority
Listing equal to or less than the ARD on the final HUD-approved FY2016 GIW?    Yes
09/11/2016
Yes    
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 16    09/14/2016
 
Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC    ND-500
Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal    COC_REG_2016_135770
 
1G. Continuum of Care (CoC) Addressing Project Capacity
 
Instructions
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
1G-1. Describe how the CoC monitors the performance of CoC Program recipients.
(limit 1000 characters)
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 17    09/14/2016
The North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People (collaborative applicant) employed a compliance specialist who worked 50% in the CoC and 50% in the SSVF program until June of 2016. After that, monitoring was done internally by the CoC using the monitoring tool developed by the Monitoring and Evaluation Committee to monitor each CoC funded project. The monitoring includes a site visit to ensure housing quality, a review of files, drawdowns, the APR, coordinated assessment participation, McKinney-Vento requirements, policies and procedures manual, and HMIS requirements. Results are reported to the Monitoring and Evaluation Committee who recommend any actions, if necessary, and provides information to the
Prioritization committee. In this grant cycle, the CoC will be undertaking an assessment and updating process to ensure that monitoring and evaluation standards are providing the oversight and guidance necessary to assist project partners and comply with HUD requirements.
1G-2. Did the Collaborative Applicant include Yes accurately completed and appropriately signed form HUD-2991(s) for all project applications submitted on the CoC Priority Listing?
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 18    09/14/2016
2A. Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Implementation
Intructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2A-1. Does the CoC have a Governance
Charter that outlines the roles and responsibilities of the CoC and the HMIS
Lead, either within the  Charter itself or by reference to a separate document like an
MOU/MOA?  In all cases, the CoC's
Governance Charter must be attached to receive credit, In addition, if applicable, any separate document, like an MOU/MOA, must also be attached to receive credit.    Yes
2A-1a. Include the page number where the roles and responsibilities of the CoC and
HMIS Lead can be found in the attached document referenced in 2A-1. In addition, in the textbox indicate if the page number applies to the CoC's attached governance charter or attached MOU/MOA.    5,6,7 in the HMIS governance charter manual
2A-2. Does the CoC have a HMIS Policies and
Procedures Manual? If yes, in order to receive credit the HMIS Policies and Procedures
Manual must be attached to the CoC Application.    Yes
2A-3. Are there agreements in place that outline roles and responsibilities between the
HMIS Lead and the Contributing HMIS Organization (CHOs)?    Yes
2A-4. What is the name of the HMIS software    Service Point
Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC    ND-500
Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal        COC_REG_2016_135770
used by the CoC (e.g., ABC Software)?
2A-5. What is the name of the HMIS software vendor (e.g., ABC Systems)?    Bowman    
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 19    09/14/2016
2B. Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Funding Sources
Instructions
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2B-1. Select the HMIS implementation Statewide coverage area:
* 2B-2. In the charts below, enter the amount of funding from each funding source that contributes to the total HMIS budget for the CoC.
Funding Source                Funding
                
    FY2016 CoC Application    Page 20        09/14/2016
2B-2.1 Funding Type: Federal - HUD
Funding Source    Funding
  CoC    $74,072
  ESG    $8,500
  CDBG    $0
  HOME    $0
  HOPWA    $0
Federal - HUD - Total Amount    $82,572
2B-2.2 Funding Type: Other Federal
Funding Source    Funding    
  Department of Education        $0
  Department of Health and Human Services        $0
  Department of Labor        $0
  Department of Agriculture        $0
  Department of Veterans Affairs        $0
  Other Federal        $0
  Other Federal - Total Amount        $0
2B-2.3 Funding Type: State and Local
 
  City    $0
  County    $0
  State    $30,000
State and Local - Total Amount    $30,000
2B-2.4 Funding Type: Private
Funding Source    Funding    
  Individual        $0
  Organization        $0
Private - Total Amount        $0
2B-2.5 Funding Type: Other
Funding Source    Funding    
  Participation Fees        $0
Other - Total Amount        $0
2B-2.6 Total Budget for Operating Year                $112,572
                
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 21        09/14/2016    
2C. Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Bed Coverage
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2C-1. Enter the date the CoC submitted the 05/02/2016 2016 HIC data in HDX, (mm/dd/yyyy):
VA Grant per diem (VA GPD):     
VASH:     
2C-2. Per the 2016 Housing Inventory Count (HIC) Indicate the number of beds in the 2016 HIC and in HMIS for each project type within the CoC.  If a particular project type does not exist in the CoC then enter "0" for all cells in that project type.
Project Type    Total Beds  in 2016 HIC    Total Beds in HIC Dedicated for DV    Total Beds in HMIS        HMIS Bed Coverage Rate
Emergency Shelter (ESG) beds    818    231        535    91.14%
Safe Haven (SH) beds    0    0        0    
Transitional Housing (TH) beds    236    125        103    92.79%
Rapid Re-Housing (RRH) beds    71    0        71    100.00%
Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) beds    603    60        543    100.00%
Other Permanent Housing (OPH) beds    178    0        0    0.00%
2C-2a. If the bed coverage rate for any project type is below 85 percent, describe how the CoC plans to increase the bed coverage rate for each of these project types in the next 12 months. (limit 1000 characters)
N/A
2C-3. If any of the project types listed in question 2C-2 above have a coverage rate below 85 percent, and some or all of these rates can be
attributed to beds covered by one of the following program types, please indicate that here by selecting all that apply from the list below.
Faith-Based projects/Rescue mission:     
Youth focused projects:     
Voucher beds (non-permanent housing):     
HOPWA projects:     
Not Applicable:    
X

2C-4. How often does the CoC review or Annually assess its HMIS bed coverage?
2D. Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Data Quality
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2D-1. Indicate the percentage of unduplicated client records with null or missing values and the percentage of "Client Doesn't Know" or "Client Refused" within the last 10 days of January 2016.
Universal Data Element    Percentage Null or Missing    Percentage
Client Doesn't
Know or Refused
3.1 Name    0%    0%
3.2 Social Security Number    7%    7%
3.3 Date of birth    3%    0%
3.4 Race    6%    0%
3.5 Ethnicity    4%    1%
3.6 Gender    3%    0%
3.7 Veteran status    5%    0%
3.8 Disabling condition    16%    1%
3.9 Residence prior to project entry    17%    1%
3.10 Project Entry Date    0%    0%
3.11 Project Exit Date    0%    0%
3.12 Destination    5%    36%
3.15 Relationship to Head of Household    40%    0%
3.16 Client Location    8%    0%
3.17 Length of time on street, in an emergency shelter, or safe haven    35%    0%
2D-2. Identify which of the following reports your HMIS generates.  Select all that apply:
CoC Annual Performance Report (APR):    
X

ESG Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER):    
X

Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) table shells:    
X

     
 
Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC    ND-500
Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal    COC_REG_2016_135770
    
None     
2D-3. If you submitted the 2016 AHAR, how many AHAR tables (i.e., ES-ind, ES-family, etc)
 were accepted and used in the last AHAR?    3
2D-4. How frequently does the CoC review data quality in the HMIS?    Monthly
2D-5. Select from the dropdown to indicate if standardized HMIS data quality reports are generated to review data quality at the CoC level, project level, or both.    Both Project and CoC
2D-6. From the following list of federal partner programs, select the ones that are currently using the CoC's HMIS.
VA Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF):    
X

VA Grant and Per Diem (GPD):    
X

Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY):    
X

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH):    
X

     
None:     
2D-6a. If any of the Federal partner programs listed in 2D-6 are not currently entering data in the CoC's HMIS and intend to begin entering data in the next 12 months, indicate the Federal partner program and the anticipated start date. (limit 750 characters)
NA
2E. Continuum of Care (CoC) Sheltered Point-inTime (PIT) Count
Instructions:
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 26    09/14/2016
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
The data collected during the PIT count is vital for both CoC's and HUD. HUD needs accurate data to understand the context and nature of homelessness throughout the country, and to provide Congressand the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) with information regarding services provided, gaps in service, and performance. Accurate, high quality data is vital to inform Congress' funding decisions.
2E-1. Did the CoC approve the final sheltered
PIT count methodology for the 2016 sheltered PIT count?    Yes
2E-2. Indicate the date of the most recent sheltered PIT count: (mm/dd/yyyy)    01/28/2016
2E-2a. If the CoC conducted the sheltered PIT count outside of the last 10 days of January 2016, was an exception granted by HUD?    Not Applicable
2E-3. Enter the date the CoC submitted the sheltered PIT count data in HDX: (mm/dd/yyyy)    05/02/2016
2F. Continuum of Care (CoC) Sheltered Point-inTime (PIT) Count: Methods
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2F-1. Indicate the method(s) used to count sheltered homeless persons during the 2016 PIT count:
Complete Census Count:    
X

Random sample and extrapolation:     
Non-random sample and extrapolation:     
     
2F-2. Indicate the methods used to gather and calculate subpopulation data for sheltered homeless persons:
HMIS:    
X

HMIS plus extrapolation:     
Interview of sheltered persons:     
Sample of PIT interviews plus extrapolation:     
     
2F-3. Provide a brief description of your CoC's sheltered PIT count methodology and describe why your CoC selected its sheltered PIT count methodology.
(limit 1000 characters)
The CoC uses HMIS data for the sheltered PIT count with the exception of DV which is surveyed. HMIS data is used because of our high bed coverage and to free volunteer time to conduct unsheltered surveys. HMIS users are reminded to have all data entered accurately and up to date so that when the sheltered PIT is run all data is current. Data that looks atypical is verified directly with the entity using HMIS. DV providers are surveyed to obtain their sheltered data.
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 28    09/14/2016
2F-4. Describe any change in methodology from your sheltered PIT count in 2015 to 2016, including any change in sampling or extrapolation method, if applicable. Do not include information on changes to the implementation of your sheltered PIT count methodology (e.g., enhanced training or change in partners participating in the PIT count). (limit 1000 characters)
NA
2F-5. Did your CoC change its provider No coverage in the 2016 sheltered count?
2F-5a. If "Yes" in 2F-5, then describe the change in provider coverage in the 2016 sheltered count. (limit 750 characters)
2G. Continuum of Care (CoC) Sheltered Point-inTime (PIT) Count: Data Quality
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2G-1. Indicate the methods used to ensure the quality of the data collected during the sheltered PIT count:
Training:    
X

Follow-up:    
X

HMIS:    
X

Non-HMIS de-duplication techniques:     
     
2G-2. Describe any change to the way your CoC implemented its sheltered PIT count from 2015 to 2016 that would change data quality, including changes to training volunteers and inclusion of any partner agencies in the sheltered PIT count planning and implementation, if applicable.  Do not include information on changes to actual sheltered PIT count methodology (e.g. change in sampling or extrapolation methods). (limit 1000 characters)
NA
2H. Continuum of Care (CoC) Unsheltered Pointin-Time (PIT) Count
Instructions:
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 30    09/14/2016
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
HUD requires CoCs to conduct an unsheltered PIT count every 2 years (biennially) during the last 10 days in January; however, HUD also strongly encourages CoCs to conduct the unsheltered PIT count annually at the same time that they conduct annual sheltered PIT counts.  HUD required CoCs to conduct the last biennial PIT count during the last 10 days in January 2015.
2H-1. Did the CoC approve the final unsheltered PIT count methodology for the most recent unsheltered PIT count?    Yes
2H-2. Indicate the date of the most recent unsheltered PIT count (mm/dd/yyyy):    01/28/2016
2H-2a. If the CoC conducted the unsheltered
PIT count outside of the last 10 days of
January 2016, or most recent count, was an exception granted by HUD?    Not Applicable
2H-3. Enter the date the CoC submitted the unsheltered PIT count data in HDX (mm/dd/yyyy):    05/02/2016
2I. Continuum of Care (CoC) Unsheltered Pointin-Time (PIT) Count: Methods
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2I-1. Indicate the methods used to count unsheltered homeless persons during the 2016 or most recent PIT count:
Night of the count - complete census:    
X

Night of the count - known locations:    
X

Night of the count - random sample:     
Service-based count:     
HMIS:     
     
2I-2. Provide a brief descripton of your CoC's unsheltered PIT count methodology and describe why your CoC selected this unsheltered PIT count methodology.
(limit 1000 characters)
North Dakota is divided into 8 planning regions and the CoC has a PIT coordinator in each who organizes the count. Agency volunteers go to known locations, service locations where people come in for food etc. and canvass areas such as big box parking lots, river fronts and railroad land. Unsheltered people are surveyed to gather all information required by HUD and other information the Needs Assessment Committee deems useful, such as TBI, health insurance, employment status, whether they have come from out of state seeking work, were they ever in foster care etc. Volunteers are trained on the survey instrument and the survey collects the initials of the respondents (not mandatory) to help in the deduplication process.
2I-3. Describe any change in methodology from your unsheltered PIT
 
count in 2015 (or 2014 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2015) to 2016, including any change in sampling or extrapolation method, if applicable. Do not include information on changes to implementation of your sheltered PIT count methodology (e.g., enhanced training or change in partners participating in the count). (limit 1000 characters)
NA
2I-4. Has the CoC taken extra measures to Yes identify unaccompanied homeless youth in
the PIT count?
2I-4a. If the response in 2I-4 was "no" describe any extra measures that are being taken to identify youth and what the CoC is doing for homeless youth.
(limit 1000 characters)
2J. Continuum of Care (CoC) Unsheltered Pointin-Time (PIT) Count: Data Quality
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
2J-1.  Indicate the steps taken by the CoC to ensure the quality of the data collected for the 2016 unsheltered PIT count:
Training:    
X

"Blitz" count:     
Unique identifier:    
X

Survey questions:    
X

Enumerator observation:    
X

     
None:     
2J-2. Describe any change to the way the CoC implemented the unsheltered PIT count from 2015 (or 2014 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2015) to 2016 that would affect data quality.  This includes changes to training volunteers and inclusion of any partner agencies in the unsheltered PIT count planning and implementation, if applicable.  Do not include information on changes in actual methodology (e.g. change in sampling or extrapolation method).  (limit 1000 characters)
NA
3A. Continuum of Care (CoC) System Performance
 
Instructions
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
3A-1. Performance Measure: Number of Persons Homeless - Point-in-Time Count.
* 3A-1a. Change in PIT Counts of Sheltered and Unsheltered Homeless Persons
Using the table below, indicate the number of persons who were homeless at a Point-in-Time (PIT) based on the 2015 and 2016 PIT counts as recorded in the Homelessness Data Exchange (HDX).
        2015 PIT
(for unsheltered count, most recent year conducted)    2016 PIT        Difference
Universe: Total PIT Count of sheltered and unsheltered persons        1,305        923    -382
     Emergency Shelter Total        640        535    -105
     Safe Haven Total        0        0    0
     Transitional Housing Total        179        172    -7
Total Sheltered Count        819        707    -112
Total Unsheltered Count        486        216    -270
3A-1b. Number of Sheltered Persons Homeless - HMIS.
Using HMIS data, enter the number of homeless persons who were served in a sheltered environment between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015 for each category provided.
        Between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015
Universe: Unduplicated Total sheltered homeless persons        3,874
Emergency Shelter Total        3,534
Safe Haven Total        0
Transitional Housing Total        340
3A-2. Performance Measure:  First Time Homeless.
Describe the CoC's efforts to reduce the number of individuals and families who become homeless for the first time.  Specifically, describe what the CoC is doing to identify risk factors of becoming homeless.
 
(limit 1000 characters)
The CoC' diversion tool identifies those who are not yet homeless, but are at risk and makes appropriate referrals to mainstream and other resources to help prevent them from becoming homeless. Also, the North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People and other stakeholders worked with the ND Department of Commerce to establish the ND Homeless Grants program which as a prevention component similar to ESG, except that it uses rent reasonableness instead of FMR and goes up to fifty percent of AMI more similar to SSVF. Privately funded agencies such as Aid Inc. in Bismarck, and Minot Area Homeless Coalition also provide prevention services.
3A-3. Performance Measure:  Length of Time Homeless.
Describe the CoC’s efforts to reduce the length of time individuals and families remain homeless.  Specifically, describe how your CoC has reduced the average length of time homeless, including how the CoC identifies and houses individuals and families with the longest lengths of time homeless.
(limit 1000 characters)
The length of time homeless is one of the factors in the vulnerability index the CoC uses in its Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System. One of the CoC's biggest challenges in terms of reducing the length of time people spend homeless is the lack and availability of affordable housing. The CoC worked with the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency to establish the Housing Incentive Fund which has been instrumental in increasing the availability of housing. Currently, the CoC is working to establish a landlord indemnification fund which will make more units available to those who are homeless. ESG, NDHG and SSVF recipients who provide rapid rehousing services all have a housing plan and housing search component that helps to reduce the length of time homeless.
* 3A-4. Performance Measure: Successful Permanent Housing Placement or Retention.
 In the next two questions, CoCs must indicate the success of its projects in placing persons from its projects into permanent housing.
3A-4a. Exits to Permanent Housing Destinations:
Fill in the chart to indicate the extent to which projects exit program participants into permanent housing (subsidized or non-subsidized) or the retention of program participants in CoC Program-funded permanent supportive housing.
            Between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015
Universe: Persons in SSO, TH and PH-RRH who exited            1,775
    
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 35    09/14/2016
Of the persons in the Universe above, how many of those exited to permanent destinations?        742
% Successful Exits        41.80%
3A-4b. Exit To or Retention Of Permanent Housing:
In the chart below, CoCs must indicate the number of persons who exited from any CoC funded permanent housing project, except rapid re-housing projects, to permanent housing destinations or retained their permanent housing between October 1, 2014 and September 31, 2015.
        Between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015
Universe: Persons in all PH projects except PH-RRH        171
Of the persons in the Universe above, indicate how many of those remained in applicable PH projects and how many of those exited to permanent destinations?        82
% Successful Retentions/Exits        47.95%
3A-5. Performance Measure: Returns to Homelessness: Describe the CoCs efforts to reduce the rate of individuals and families who return to homelessness. Specifically, describe strategies your CoC has implemented to identify and minimize returns to homelessness, and demonstrate the use of HMIS or a comparable database to monitor and record returns to homelessness. (limit 1000 characters)
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 36    09/14/2016
Those who are housed through rapid rehousing programs have a housing stability plan that incudes contingencies for emergencies. The CoC is advocating for a state funded long term rental assistance program that uses rent reasonableness and serves those at 50% AMI or less. The CoC is also working with its constituents to have them reduce their program barriers in attempts to reduce program exits from supportive housing due to client compliance issues. The CoC is also working to increase the amount of affordable housing through the Housing Incentive Fund and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program and HOME funds. The CoC is just beginning to track returns to homelessness and has worked with its vendor (BOWMAN) to create reports for this purpose.
3A-6. Performance Measure: Job and Income Growth.
Performance Measure: Job and Income Growth. Describe the CoC's specific strategies to assist CoC Program-funded projects to increase program participants' cash income from employment and nonemployment non-cash sources. (limit 1000 characters)
This year, the CoC became involved in trying to address issues surrounding poverty that lead to homelessness. Some of these issues include public policy matters such as predatory lending, Earned Income Tax Credit and credit checks prior to employment. All of these issues make it difficult to break out of the cycle of poverty even after you have secured permanent housing.
3A-6a. Describe how the CoC is working with mainstream employment organizations to aid homeless individuals and families in increasing their income.
(limit 1000 characters)
North Dakota Job Service is a member of the CoC and presents annually at CoC meetings on employment. North Dakota has many jobs available and 55% on ND's homeless are employed (PIT data).
3A-7.  What was the the criteria and decision-making process the CoC used to identify and exclude specific geographic areas from the CoC's unsheltered PIT count? (limit 1000 characters)
NA
3A-7a. Did the CoC completely exclude No geographic areas from the the most recent
PIT count (i.e., no one counted there and, for communities using samples the area was excluded from both the sample and
extrapolation) where the CoC determined that there were no unsheltered homeless people, including areas that are uninhabitable (e.g. disasters)?
3A-7b. Did the CoC completely exclude geographic areas from the the most recent PIT count (i.e., no one counted there and, for communities using samples the area was excluded from both the sample and extrapolation) where the CoC determined that there were no unsheltered homeless people, including areas that are uninhabitable (e.g. deserts, wilderness, etc.)? (limit 1000 characters)
NA
3A-8.  Enter the date the CoC submitted the 08/10/2016 system performance measure data into HDX.
The System Performance Report generated by HDX must be attached. (mm/dd/yyyy)
3A-8a.  If the CoC was unable to submit their System Performance Measures data to HUD via the HDX by the deadline, explain why and describe what specific steps they are taking to ensure they meet the next HDX submission deadline for System Performance Measures data.
 
Applicant: North Dakota Statewide CoC    ND-500
Project: ND 500 CoC FY 2016 renewal        COC_REG_2016_135770
 (limit 1500 characters)
NA        
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 38    09/14/2016
3B. Continuum of Care (CoC) Performance and Strategic Planning Objectives
 
Objective 1: Ending Chronic Homelessness
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
To end chronic homelessness by 2017, HUD encourages three areas of focus through the implementation of Notice CPD 14-012: Prioritizing Persons Experiencing Chronic Homelessness in Permanent Supportive Housing and Recordkeeping Requirements for Documenting Chronic Homeless Status.
1.    Targeting persons with the highest needs and longest histories ofhomelessness for existing and new permanent supportive housing;
2.    Prioritizing chronically homeless
individuals, youth and families who have the longest histories of homelessness; and
3.    The highest needs for new and turnover units.
3B-1.1. Compare the total number of chronically homeless persons, which includes persons in families, in the CoC as reported by the CoC for the 2016 PIT count compared to 2015 (or 2014 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2015).
        2015
(for unsheltered count, most recent year conducted)    2016        Difference    
Universe: Total PIT Count of sheltered and unsheltered chronically homeless persons        138        89        -49
Sheltered Count of chronically homeless persons        68        41        -27
Unsheltered Count of chronically homeless persons        70        48        -22
3B-1.1a. Using the "Differences" calculated in question 3B-1.1 above, explain the reason(s) for any increase, or no change in the overall TOTAL number of chronically homeless persons in the CoC, as well as the change in the unsheltered count, as reported in the PIT count in 2016 compared to 2015.
(limit 1000 characters)
NA
3B-1.2.  Compare the total number of PSH beds (CoC Program and non-
CoC Program funded) that were identified as dedicated for use by chronically homeless persons on the 2016 Housing Inventory Count, as compared to those identified on the 2015 Housing Inventory Count.
    2015    2016    Difference
Number of CoC Program and non-CoC Program funded PSH beds dedicated for use by chronically homelessness persons identified on the HIC.    136    70    -66
3B-1.2a.  Explain the reason(s) for any increase, number of PSH beds (CoC program funded or n that were identified as dedicated for use by chr on the 2016 Housing Inventory Count compared 2015 Housing Inventory Count.
(limit 1000 characters)
Projects opened their CH beds to accept other cat individuals.
3B-1.3. Did the CoC adopt the Orders of
Priority into their standards for all CoC
Program funded PSH as described in Notice
CPD-14-012:  Prioritizing Persons
Experiencing Chronic Homelessness in
Permanent Supportive Housing and
Recordkeeping Requirements for Documenting Chronic Homeless Status?    No     or no change in the total
on-CoC Program funded)
onically homeless persons
 to those identified on the
egories of homeless
3B-1.3a. If “Yes” was selected for question
3B-1.3, attach a copy of the CoC’s written standards or other evidence that clearly shows the incorporation of the Orders of
Priority in Notice CPD  14-012 and indicate the page(s) for all documents where the Orders of Priority are found.
3B-1.4.  Is the CoC on track to meet the goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2017?
This question will not be scored.
3B-1.4a.  If the response to question strategies that have been implement resources to meet this goal?  If “No”     Yes     B-1.4 was “Yes” what are the ed by the CoC to maximize current was selected, what resources or
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 40    09/14/2016
technical assistance will be implemented by the CoC to reach to goal of ending chronically homelessness by 2017? (limit 1000 characters)
The CoC is prioritizing resources for chronic homelessness.  Grand Forks Housing Authority is constructing a 40 bed facility for chronically homeless that will be online in 2018. Next year, YouthWorks is adding beds for chronically homeless youth and the YWCA Cass/Clay added 9 chronically homeless units in the last year.
 
3B. Continuum of Care (CoC) Strategic Planning Objectives
 
3B. Continuum of Care (CoC) Strategic Planning Objectives
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
HUD will evaluate CoC's based on the extent to which they are making progress to achieve the goal of ending homelessness among households with children by 2020.
3B-2.1. What factors will the CoC use to prioritize households with children during the FY2016 Operating year? (Check all that apply).
Vulnerability to victimization:    
X

Number of previous homeless episodes:    
X

Unsheltered homelessness:    
X

Criminal History:     
Bad credit or rental history (including  not having been a leaseholder):     
Head of household has mental/physical disabilities:    
X

     
     
N/A:     
3B-2.2. Describe the CoC's strategies including concrete steps  to rapidly rehouse every household with children within 30 days of those families becoming homeless. (limit 1000 characters)
Part of the challenge is to have beds available for homeless families in supportive programs. YWCA Cass/Clay has nine new units for families. Welcome House in Bismarck has doubled the size of its privately and state funded transition program for families to 50 beds.
The Jeremiah Project in Fargo is building a facility that will provide housing for homeless families using Housing Incentive Funds (HIF). In addition to increasing the number of available supportive and transitional housing units, the CoC is also working on the number of affordable units through the HIF and
LIHTC. Rapid rehousing dollars come from SSVF, ESG and the North Dakota
Homeless Grants NDHG)
3B-2.3. Compare the number of RRH units available to serve families from the 2015 and 2016 HIC.
 
3B-2.4. How does the CoC ensure that emergency shelters, transitional housing, and permanent housing (PSH and RRH) providers within the CoC
do not deny admission to or separate any family members from other
members of their family based on age, sex, gender or disability when entering shelter or housing? (check all strategies that apply)
CoC policies and procedures prohibit involuntary family separation:     
There is a method for clients to alert CoC when involuntarily separated:     
CoC holds trainings on preventing involuntary family separation, at least once a year:     
     
     
None:    
X

3B-2.5. Compare the total number of homeless households with children in the CoC as reported by the CoC for the 2016 PIT count compared to 2015 (or 2014 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2015).
PIT Count of Homelessness Among Households With Children
    2015 (for unsheltered count, most recent year conducted)    2016        Difference
            
FY2016 CoC Application        Page 43        09/14/2016
Universe: Total PIT Count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless households with children:    144    77    -67
Sheltered Count of homeless households with children:    88    65    -23
Unsheltered Count of homeless households with children:    56    12    -44
3B-2.5a. Explain the reason(s) for any increase, or no change in the total number of homeless households with children in the CoC as reported in the 2016 PIT count compared to the 2015 PIT count. (limit 1000 characters)
NA
3B-2.6. From the list below select the  strategies to the CoC uses to address the unique needs of unaccompanied homeless youth including youth under age 18, and youth ages 18-24, including the following.
Human trafficking and other forms of exploitation?        Yes
LGBTQ youth homelessness?        Yes
Exits from foster care into homelessness?        Yes
Family reunification and community engagement?        Yes
Positive Youth Development, Trauma Informed Care, and the use of Risk and Protective Factors in assessing youth housing and service needs?        Yes
Unaccompanied minors/youth below the age of 18?        Yes
3B-2.6a. Select all strategies that the CoC uses to address homeless youth trafficking and other forms of exploitation.
Diversion from institutions and decriminalization of youth actions that stem from being trafficked:    
X

Increase housing and service options for youth fleeing or attempting to flee trafficking:    
X

Specific sampling methodology for enumerating and characterizing local youth trafficking:     
Cross systems strategies  to quickly identify and prevent occurrences of youth trafficking:    
X

Community awareness training concerning youth trafficking:    
X

     
N/A:     
3B-2.7. What factors will the CoC use to prioritize unaccompanied youth including youth under age 18, and youth ages 18-24 for housing and services during the FY 2016 operating year? (Check all that apply)
Vulnerability to victimization:    
X

Length of time homeless:    
X

Unsheltered homelessness:    
X

Lack of access to family and community support networks:    
X

     
     
N/A:     
3B-2.8. Using HMIS, compare all unaccompanied youth including youth under age 18, and youth ages 18-24 served in any HMIS contributing
program who were in an unsheltered situation prior to entry in FY 2014 (October 1, 2013-September 30, 2014) and FY 2015 (October 1, 2014 September 30, 2015).
        FY 2014
(October 1, 2013 September 30, 2014)        FY 2015
 (October 1, 2014 September 30, 2105)    Difference
Total number of unaccompanied youth served in HMIS contributing programs who were in an unsheltered situation prior to entry:            4    13    9
3B-2.8a. If the number of unaccompanied youth and children, and youthheaded households with children served in any HMIS contributing program who were in an unsheltered situation prior to entry in FY 2015 is lower than FY 2014 explain why. (limit 1000 characters)
NA
3B-2.9. Compare funding for youth homelessness in the CoC's geographic area in CY 2016 and CY 2017.
 
CoC Program funding for youth homelessness dedicated projects:        $444,000.00    $124,575.00    ($319,425.00)
Non-CoC funding for youth homelessness dedicated projects (e.g. RHY or other Federal, State and Local funding):        $730,000.00    $730,000.00    $0.00
3B-2.10. To what extent have youth services and educational representatives, and CoC representatives participated in each other's meetings between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016?
Cross-Participation in Meetings        # Times    
CoC meetings or planning events attended by LEA or SEA representatives:            4
LEA or SEA meetings or planning events (e.g. those about child welfare, juvenille justice or out of school time) attended by CoC representatives:            2
CoC meetings or planning events attended by youth housing and service providers (e.g. RHY providers):            4
3B-2.10a. Based on the responses in 3B-2.10, describe in detail how the CoC collaborates with the McKinney-Vento local educational authorities and school districts. (limit 1000 characters)
Jacki Harasym from the ND Department of Instruction is a regular participant in the CoC. she imparts information to the Liaisons across the state, and several of the liaisons participate in local homeless coalition meetings. The CoC monitors compliance with McKinney Vento requirements through its annual project monitoring and collects McKinney Vento polices from the individual school districts.
3B-2.11. How does the CoC make sure that homeless individuals and families who become homeless  are informed of their eligibility for and receive access to educational services?  Include the policies and procedures that homeless service providers (CoC and ESG Programs) are required to follow. (limit 2000 characters)
CoC standards require that all transitional and shelter facilities have a staff persons whose job is to connect on a regular basis with their local school district's homeless liaison. All homeless children are to be connected with the liaisons within 2 business days. The Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System identifies eligible youth and families and prioritizes them using the SPDAT (separate for youth) and makes the appropriate referral based on the vulnerability index.
3B-2.12. Does the CoC or any HUD-funded projects within the CoC have any written agreements with a program that services infants, toddlers, and youth children, such as Head Start; Child Care and Development Fund; Healthy Start; Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting programs;
 

Public Pre-K; and others?
 (limit 1000 characters) unknown. That information will be collected at the next CoC meeting.    
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 47        09/14/2016
3B. Continuum of Care (CoC) Performance and Strategic Planning Objectives
 
Objective 3: Ending  Veterans Homelessness
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
Opening Doors outlines the goal of ending Veteran homelessness by the end of 2016. The following questions focus on the various strategies that will aid communities in meeting this goal.
3B-3.1. Compare the total number of homeless Veterans in the CoC as reported by the CoC for the 2016 PIT count compared to 2015 (or 2014 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2015).
        2015 (for unsheltered count, most recent year conducted)    2016        Difference    
Universe: Total PIT count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless veterans:        137        116        -21
Sheltered count of homeless veterans:        90        63        -27
Unsheltered count of homeless veterans:        47        53        6
3B-3.1a. Explain the reason(s) for any increase, or no change in the total number of homeless veterans in the CoC as reported in the 2016 PIT count compared to the 2015 PIT count.
(limit 1000 characters)
Overall veteran homelessness has been decreasing. However, because the unsheltered PIT count is a snapshot of one night, it could be that it was simply those surveying were able to identify six more veterans unsheltered that evening. The weather could have been relatively mild for example and a handful more veterans were identified.
3B-3.2. Describe how the CoC identifies, assesses, and refers homeless veterans who are eligible for Veterean's Affairs services and housing to appropriate reources such as HUD-VASH and SSVF.
(limit 1000 characters)
The Coordinated Assessment, Referral and Evaluation System screens for veteran status and all veterans are referred to the VA to determine eligibility for VA benefits. SSVF also works to ensure that all veterans are connected to the VA. In 2016, SSVF joined CARES.
3B-3.3.  Compare the total number of homeless Veterans in the CoC and the total number of unsheltered homeless Veterans in the CoC, as
reported by the CoC for the 2016 PIT Count compared to the 2010 PIT Count (or 2009 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2010).
    2010 (or 2009 if an unsheltered count was not conducted in 2010)    2016        % Difference
Total PIT Count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless veterans:    121        116    -4.13%
Unsheltered Count of homeless veterans:    2        53    2,550.00%
3B-3.4. Indicate from the dropdown whether Yes you are on target to end Veteran homelessness by the end of 2016.
This question will not be scored.
3B-3.4a. If "Yes", what are the strategies being used to maximize your current resources to meet this goal? If "No" what resources or technical assistance would help you reach the goal of ending Veteran homelessness by the end of 2016?
(limit 1000 characters)
The difference in counts from 2009 to 2016 is largely due to increased outreach and identification as well as progress in completing the PIT.  The Community Plan relies heavily on the resources of VASH and SSVF, but also includes veteran crisis beds in several shelters across the state, as well as a Grant and Per Diem (Project HART) program in Fargo. Recently it has been difficult to fill the crisis and GPD beds due to few veterans needing the services. The only part of the state where housing homeless veterans still poses a significant challenge is in the oil patch in the western part of the state. NDCHP and its subgrantees has developed a separate outreach plan for the region and will be receiving TA from HUD for the problem. One of the most important parts of the outreach program is outreach to landlords to create available housing for veterans.
4A. Accessing Mainstream Benefits
 
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
4A-1. Does the CoC systematically provide Yes information to provider staff about mainstream benefits, including up-to-date resources on eligibility and program changes that can affect homeless clients?
4A-2.  Based on the CoC's FY 2016 new and renewal project applications, what percentage of projects have demonstrated they are assisting project participants to obtain mainstream benefits? This includes all of the
following within each project: transportation assistance, use of a single application, annual follow-ups with participants, and SOAR-trained staff technical assistance to obtain SSI/SSDI?
 FY 2016 Assistance with Mainstream Benefits
Total number of project applications in the FY 2016 competition (new and renewal):        20
Total number of renewal and new project applications that demonstrate assistance to project participants to obtain mainstream benefits (i.e. In a Renewal Project Application, “Yes” is selected for Questions 2a, 2b and 2c on Screen 4A. In a New Project Application, "Yes" is selected for Questions 5a, 5b, 5c, 6, and 6a on Screen 4A).        20
Percentage of renewal and new project applications in the FY 2016 competition that have demonstrated assistance to project participants to obtain mainstream benefits:        100%
4A-3. List the organizations (public, private, non-profit and other) that you collaborate with to facilitate health insurance enrollment, (e.g., Medicaid, Medicare,  Affordable Care Act options) for program participants.  For each organization you partner with, detail the specific outcomes resulting from the partnership in the establishment of benefits.
(limit 1000 characters)
Beginning in 2013 the CoC included questions in the PIT tool about health insurance and discovered that only about 10% of the homeless people in the state had health insurance. In 2014 and 2015 the CoC included the same question but also provided contact information for the ACA navigators. The navigators have presented at CoC meetings and at two annual conferences sponsored by the North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People. And since the state of North Dakota passed Medicaid expansion, that increased health coverage for North Dakota's homeless population.  Also, the CoC requested and received TA focused on how to affect policy change that would provide more resources for expanding healthcare coverage.
4A-4. What are the primary ways the CoC ensures that program participants with health insurance are able to effectively utilize the healthcare benefits available to them?
Educational materials:    
X

In-Person Trainings:    
X

Transportation to medical appointments:    
X

     
     
     
Not Applicable or None:     
 
4B. Additional Policies
 
Instructions:
For guidance on completing this form, please reference the FY 2016 CoC Application Detailed Instructions and the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition NOFA. Please submit technical questions to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question.
4B-1. Based on the CoCs FY 2016 new and renewal project applications, what percentage of Permanent Housing (PSH and RRH), Transitional Housing (TH), and SSO (non-Coordinated Entry) projects in the CoC are low barrier?
 FY 2016 Low Barrier Designation
Total number of PH (PSH and RRH), TH and non-Coordinated Entry SSO project applications in the FY 2016 competition (new and renewal):    20
Total number of PH (PSH and RRH), TH and non-Coordinated Entry SSO renewal and new project applications that selected “low barrier” in the FY 2016 competition:    20
Percentage of PH (PSH and RRH), TH and non-Coordinated Entry SSO renewal and new project applications in the FY 2016 competition that will be designated as “low barrier”:    100%
4B-2. What percentage of CoC Program-funded Permanent Supportive
Housing (PSH), Rapid Re-Housing (RRH), SSO (non-Coordinated Entry)
and Transitional Housing (TH) FY 2016 Projects have adopted a Housing
First approach, meaning that the project quickly houses clients without preconditions or service participation requirements?
FY 2016 Projects Housing First Designation
Total number of PSH, RRH, non-Coordinated Entry SSO, and TH project applications in the FY 2016 competition (new and renewal):    20
Total number of PSH, RRH, non-Coordinated Entry SSO, and TH renewal and new project applications that selected Housing First in the FY 2016 competition:    13
Percentage of PSH, RRH, non-Coordinated Entry SSO,  and TH renewal and new project applications in the FY 2016 competition that will be designated as Housing First:    65%
4B-3. What has the CoC done to ensure awareness of and access to housing and supportive services within the CoC’s geographic area to persons that could benefit from CoC-funded programs but are not
currently participating in a CoC funded program? In particular, how does the CoC reach out to for persons that are least likely to request housing or services in the absence of special outreach?
Direct outreach and marketing:            
X

        
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 52    09/14/2016
Use of phone or internet-based services like 211:     
Marketing in languages commonly spoken in the community:    
X

Making physical and virtual locations accessible to those with disabilities:    
X

     
     
     
Not applicable:     
4B-4. Compare the number of RRH units available to serve populations from the 2015 and 2016 HIC.
 
4B-5. Are any new proposed project No applications requesting $200,000 or more in funding for housing rehabilitation or new
construction?
4B-6. If "Yes" in Questions 4B-5, then describe the activities that the project(s) will undertake to ensure that employment, training and other economic opportunities are directed to low or very low income persons to comply with section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (12 U.S.C. 1701u) (Section 3) and HUD’s implementing rules at 24 CFR part 135?
 (limit 1000 characters)
NA
4B-7. Is the CoC requesting to designate one No or more of its SSO or TH projects to serve families with children and youth defined as homeless under other Federal statutes?
4B-7a. If "Yes", to question 4B-7, describe how the use of grant funds to serve such persons is of equal or greater priority than serving persons defined as homeless in accordance with 24 CFR 578.89. Description must include whether or not this is listed as a priority in the Consolidated Plan(s) and its CoC strategic plan goals. CoCs must attach the list of projects that would be serving this population (up to 10 percent of CoC total award) and the applicable portions of the Consolidated Plan. (limit 2500 characters)
NA
4B-8. Has the project been affected by a No major disaster, as declared by the President
Obama under Title IV of the Robert T. Stafford
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistanct
Act, as amended (Public Law 93-288) in the 12 months prior to the opening of the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition?
4B-8a. If "Yes" in Question 4B-8, describe the impact of the natural disaster on specific projects in the CoC and how this affected the CoC's ability to address homelessness and provide the necessary reporting to HUD.
(limit 1500 characters)
NA
4B-9. Did the CoC or any of its CoC program Yes recipients/subrecipients request technical assistance from HUD since the submission of the FY 2015 application? This response does not affect the scoring of this application.
4B-9a. If "Yes" to Question 4B-9, check the box(es) for which technical assistance was requested.
This response does not affect the scoring of this application.
CoC Governance:     
CoC Systems Performance Measurement:     
Coordinated Entry:     
Data reporting and data analysis:     
HMIS:     
Homeless subpopulations targeted by Opening Doors: veterans, chronic, children and families, and unaccompanied youth:    
X

Maximizing the use of mainstream resources:    
X

Retooling transitional housing:     
Rapid re-housing:     
Under-performing program recipient, subrecipient or project:     
     
Not applicable:     
4B-9b. Indicate the type(s) of Technical Aassistance that was provided, using the categories listed in 4B-9a, provide the month and year the CoC Program recipient or sub-recipient received the assistance and the value of the Technical Assistance to the CoC/recipient/sub recipient involved given the local conditions at the time, with 5 being the highest value and a 1 indicating no value.
Type of Technical Assistance Received    Date Received        Rate the Value of the Technical Assistance
accessing healthcare    03/01/2016    3    
Ending Vetean Homelessness    02/01/2016    3    
            
            
            
4C. Attachments
 
Instructions:
Multiple files may be attached as a single .zip file. For instructions on how to use .zip files, a reference document is available on the e-snaps training site: https://www.hudexchange.info/resource/3118/creating-a-zip-file-and-capturing-a-screenshotresource
Document Type    Required?    Document Description    Date Attached
01. 2016 CoC Consolidated
Application: Evidence of the CoC's communication to rejected participants    Yes    RRVCA Rejection    09/13/2016
02. 2016 CoC Consolidated
Application: Public Posting
Evidence    Yes    Consolidated appl...    09/13/2016
03. CoC Rating and Review
Procedure (e.g. RFP)    Yes    ND 500 NOFA Proce...    09/13/2016
04. CoC's Rating and Review
Procedure: Public Posting
Evidence    Yes    Procedure evidence    09/13/2016
05. CoCs Process for
Reallocating    Yes    Reallocation Policy    09/13/2016
06. CoC's Governance Charter    Yes    Governance Charter    09/13/2016
07. HMIS Policy and
Procedures Manual    Yes    HMIS policies    09/12/2016
08. Applicable Sections of Con
Plan to Serving Persons
Defined as Homeless Under
Other Fed Statutes    No        
09. PHA Administration Plan
(Applicable Section(s) Only)    Yes    LT Homeless Prefe...    09/13/2016
10. CoC-HMIS MOU (if referenced in the CoC's Goverance Charter)    No        
11. CoC Written Standards for
Order of Priority    No        
12. Project List to Serve
Persons Defined as Homeless under Other Federal Statutes (if applicable)    No        
13. HDX-system Performance
Measures    Yes    System Performanc...    09/12/2016
14. Other    No        
15. Other    No        
 

Attachment Details
 
Document Description: RRVCA Rejection
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: Consolidated application
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: ND 500 NOFA Procedure
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: Procedure evidence
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: Reallocation Policy
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: Governance Charter    
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 57        09/14/2016

 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: HMIS policies
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description:
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: LT Homeless Preference
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description:
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description:
 
Attachment Details
     
FY2016 CoC Application    Page 58        09/14/2016
Document Description:
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description: System Performance Measures 2016
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description:
 
Attachment Details
 
Document Description:
 
Submission Summary
 
Ensure that the Project Priority List is complete prior to submitting.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page    Last Updated
1A. Identification    08/17/2016
1B. CoC Engagement    Please Complete
1C. Coordination    09/07/2016

1D. CoC Discharge Planning    08/26/2016
1E. Coordinated Assessment    08/26/2016
1F. Project Review    09/14/2016
1G. Addressing Project Capacity    09/14/2016
2A. HMIS Implementation    08/26/2016
2B. HMIS Funding Sources    08/26/2016
2C. HMIS Beds    09/14/2016
2D. HMIS Data Quality    09/13/2016
2E. Sheltered PIT    09/14/2016
2F. Sheltered Data - Methods    09/14/2016
2G. Sheltered Data - Quality    09/07/2016
2H. Unsheltered PIT    09/14/2016
2I. Unsheltered Data - Methods    09/14/2016
2J. Unsheltered Data - Quality    09/07/2016
3A. System Performance    09/14/2016
3B. Objective 1    09/13/2016
3B. Objective 2    09/14/2016
3B. Objective 3    09/14/2016
4A. Benefits    09/14/2016
4B. Additional Policies    09/14/2016
4C. Attachments    09/13/2016
Submission Summary    No Input Required
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Subject: Red River Valley Community Action in Grand Forks Renewal Application
From: april@ndhomelesscoalition.org
Date: Mon, Sep 12, 2016 5:40 pm
To: KKEYS@rrvca.com
Cc: "Andrea Olson" <andreao@capnd.org>
Attach: left.letterhead
Kent,
I regret to inform you that your application for renewal was rejected by the Prioritization Committee.
The decision was based on the following:
    1.) Recaptured grant funds from previous unspent grants
($22,649)
    2.) Grant funds in danger of future recapture ($47,910)
    3.) Missed deadlines
Therefore, the decision was made to reallocate RRVCA funds to a new project.
Thank you for your application and I sincerely hope we are able to work together in the future.
April Fairfield
Executive Director
North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People, Inc.
"Leading the Way Home"
4023 State St N • Suite 40 Bismarck ND 58503
www.ndhomelesscoalition.org 701-390-1635
"As a voice for people who are homeless, the North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People coordinates and supports efforts to provide basic human needs and housing."
NOTICE-CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION - The information in this communication is proprietary and strictly confidential. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or the
1 of 2    9/13/16, 9:34 AM
 
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employee
or agent responsible to deliver it to the intended recipient, any dissemination, distribution, copying or other use of the information
contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have
received this communication in error, please first notify the sender immediately and then delete this communication from all data storage devices and destroy all hard copies.
Copyright © 2003-2016. All rights reserved.
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HUD CoC Project Ranking and Prioritization Requirements
Updated: September 2016
ND-500 will utilize the following ranking and prioritization requirements for the 2016 HUD CoC NOFA Competition.  These conditions are designed to inform Ranking Committee deliberations and provide all applicants and renewing projects with clarity regarding how ranking and prioritization occur. 
ELIGIBILITY
To be eligible for inclusion in the CoC Ranking and Prioritization process, all projects must pass all facets of the CoC Application process including:
1.    Project Application is for an eligible new or renewal Transitional Housing, Rapid-Rehousing, HMIS, SSO-CES, or Permanent Supportive Housing project;
2.    Project meets all HUD Eligibility Criteria and Quality Threshold Requirements;
a.    Applicant has a DUNS # and has current SAM registration.
b.    Applicant is a nonprofit organization, State or local government, instrument of a State or local government or Public housing agency, as such term is defined in 24 CFR 5.100.
c.    Applicant participates or has ability and willingness to participate in HMIS.
d.    Applicant demonstrates financial and management capacity and experience to successfully carry out project.
e.    Applicant submits required certifications as required in the NOFA.
f.    Applicant agrees to only serve persons who are eligible as defined in Hearth Act regulations.
g.    Project draws down funds from LOCCS/eLOCCS at least quarterly.
    3.    Project meets all CoC Eligibility and Threshold Requirements;
a.    Participation in CoC Membership and Committee meetings;
b.    Participation or ability and willingness to participate in Coordinated Entry
c.    Project agrees to link households to mainstream services.
 
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VERSION 1.0  
MAY 20, 2013
 
  
 
HOMELESS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
SUMMARY SHEET .................................................................................................................. 3
INFORMATION ........................................................................................................................................... 3
VERSION RECORD ...................................................................................................................................... 3
GOVERANCE CHARTER ........................................................................................................... 4
PURPOSE ................................................................................................................................................... 4
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................................... 4
GENERAL DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................................. 4
ND Statewide Continuum of Care (CoC) ............................................................................................... 4
Lead Agency Designation ...................................................................................................................... 4
Needs Assessment Committee ............................................................................................................. 4
Funding ................................................................................................................................................. 5
Software and Hosting ............................................................................................................................ 5
Compliance with Standards .................................................................................................................. 5
Local Operational Policies and Agreements .......................................................................................... 5
SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................................................................................... 5
ND Statewide CoC Responsibilities ....................................................................................................... 5
NDCHP Responsibilities ......................................................................................................................... 5
PERIOD OF OPERATION ............................................................................................................................. 7
Period and Termination ......................................................................................................................... 7
Amendments ......................................................................................................................................... 7
SECURITY PLAN...................................................................................................................... 8
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................................... 8
ADMINISTRATION ...................................................................................................................................... 8
PHYSICAL SAFEGUARDS ............................................................................................................................. 8
TECHNICAL SAFEGUARDS .......................................................................................................................... 9
DATA QUALITY PLAN .............................................................................................................. 9
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................... 9
DATA AND TECHNICAL STANDARDS ........................................................................................................ 10
What is Data Quality? ......................................................................................................................... 10
What is a Data Quality Plan? ............................................................................................................... 10 What is a Data Quality Monitoring Plan? ............................................................................................ 10
DETAILS AND SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................................................. 10
Data Timeliness ................................................................................................................................... 10
Data Completeness ............................................................................................................................. 11
Data Accuracy and Consistency........................................................................................................... 12
Monitoring .......................................................................................................................................... 13
Incentives and Enforcement ............................................................................................................... 13
DISASTER RECOVERY PLAN ................................................................................................... 14
FUNDING ................................................................................................................................................. 14
STAFFING ................................................................................................................................................. 14
VENDORS ................................................................................................................................................. 14
SOFTWARE .............................................................................................................................................. 15
INFORMATION SECURITY ........................................................................................................................ 15
COMMUNITY/POLITICAL ......................................................................................................................... 16
LEGAL/COMPLIANCE ............................................................................................................................... 17
DATA/PARTICIPATION .............................................................................................................................. 17
APPENDIX............................................................................................................................ 17
BACKUP AND ANTI-VIRUS SUMMARY ..................................................................................................... 17
BOWMAN SYSTEMS DATA SECURITY ....................................................................................................... 18
Access Security .................................................................................................................................... 18
Site Security......................................................................................................................................... 19
Building Security ................................................................................................................................. 19
Bowman Systems Headquarters Security ........................................................................................... 19
Network Security ................................................................................................................................. 19
Data Security ....................................................................................................................................... 20
Firewalls .............................................................................................................................................. 20
Encryption ........................................................................................................................................... 20
Disaster Receovery .............................................................................................................................. 21
HIPAA Compliance ............................................................................................................................... 22
Unauthorized Access ........................................................................................................................... 22
 
 
      
 
SUMMARY SHEET
INFORMATION
 
 
Document Type:      
Policies & Procedures
 
Document Number: 
      
HMIS 101
 
Document Purpose:     The purpose of this documentation is to formulate policies and procedures related to the operation of a homeless management information system. The intent of this document is to facilitate communication, clearly define the obligations of all parties, clarify roles and responsibilities, and establish safeguards relevant to risk management. 
 
Parties/Partners:      
North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People
North Dakota HMIS Agencies
Bowman Systems
 
Effective Date: 
      
May 20, 2013
 
 
VERSION RECORD
 
Version Number     Release Date     Comments
1.0     May 20, 2013     General release
           
  
      
 
GOVERANCE CHARTER
PURPOSE
 
The purpose of this charter is to confirm agreements between the North Dakota Statewide Continuum of
Care (CoC) as a group of homeless service providers and community agencies and NDCHP as the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) lead agency for the CoC.  As such, the charter sets forth the general understandings, and specific responsibilities of each party relating to key aspects of the governance and operations of the ND HMIS.   
 
BACKGROUND
 
HMIS is a computerized data collection application designed to capture information about homeless people and homeless programs over time.  HMIS is mandated by US Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) for all communities and agencies receiving HUD Continuum of Care (CoC) homeless assistance funds.  HMIS is essential to efforts to streamline client services and inform public policy.  
Through HMIS, homeless people benefit from improved coordination in and between agencies, informed advocacy efforts, and policies that result in targeted services.   
 
Analysis of information gathered through HMIS is critical to the preparation of a periodic accounting of homelessness in ND, which may include measuring the extent and nature of homelessness, the utilization of services and homeless programs over time, and the effectiveness of homeless programs.  Such an unduplicated accounting of homelessness is necessary to service and systems planning, effective resources allocation, and advocacy.  The parties to this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) share a common interest in collaborating to end homelessness and successfully implementing and operating HMIS in ND. 
 
The NDCHP is a statewide collaborative that works to provide a range of homeless housing and services.  The continuum of care system components includes prevention, emergency shelter, transitional housing, permanent supportive housing and supportive services at each stage.  HMIS will enable homeless service providers to collect uniform client information over time.  Analysis of information gathered through HMIS is critical to accurately calculate the size, characteristics, and needs of the homeless population; these data are necessary to service and systems planning, and advocacy. 
 
GENERAL DEFINITIONS
 
ND STATEWIDE CONTINUUM OF CARE (COC) 
The ND Statewide CoC is the lead-planning organization for efforts to end homelessness and for implementing and operating a homeless CoC system in ND.  As such and under HUD policy, the ND Statewide CoC is responsible for HMIS oversight and implementation, including planning, software selection, and setting up and managing the HMIS in compliance with HUD's national HMIS Standards.  NDCHP's oversight and governance responsibilities are carried out by the Needs Assessment
Committee (described below), which also discusses and approves all HMIS policies and procedures. 
LEAD AGENCY DESIGNATION
The ND Statewide CoC and the Needs Assessment Committee designate NDCHP as the HMIS Lead Agency to manage HMIS operation on its behalf and to provide HMIS administrative functions at the direction of the Continuum of Care, through its Needs Assessment Committee. 
NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE
The ND Statewide CoC members and HMIS partner agencies actively participate with NDCHP through the Needs Assessment Committee in the management of the HMIS process, including establishing policies, procedures and protocols for privacy, data sharing protocols, data analysis, reporting, data integrity/quality, etc. essential to the viability and success of the HMIS. 
FUNDING
HMIS activities are covered by a HUD CoC grant and HUD-required local match funds (user fees). 
SOFTWARE AND HOSTING
The ND Statewide CoC has selected a single software product-ServicePoint-to serve as the sole HMIS software application in ND.  All partner agencies agree to use ServicePoint as configured for the ND HMIS. 
COMPLIANCE WITH STANDARDS
The HMIS is operated in compliance with HUD HMIS Data and Technical Standards and other applicable laws.  The parties agree to comply with any and all applicable HUD Standards. 
LOCAL OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND AGREEMENTS
The HMIS continues to operate within the framework of agreements, policies and procedures that have been developed and approved over time by the ND Statewide CoC.  These agreements, policies and procedures include but are not limited to the Policies and Procedures Manual, Privacy Policies and Notices, 
Client Release of Information (ROI) Forms and Procedures, Standardized Information Collection Forms (Intake and Exit), Partner Agency Agreements, and User Agreements.  Changes to the policies and procedures may be made from time by the ND Statewide CoC, through its Needs Assessment Committee, to comply with the HMIS Standards or otherwise improve HMIS operations. 
 
SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES
 
ND STATEWIDE COC RESPONSIBILITIES
 
The ND Statewide CoC serves as the lead HMIS governance body, providing oversight, project direction, policy setting, and guidance for the HMIS project.  The ND Statewide CoC exercises all its responsibilities for HMIS governance through its Needs Assessment Committee.  These responsibilities include: 
 
a.    Responsible for ensuring and monitoring compliance with the HUD HMIS Standards
b.    Designating the HMIS Lead Agency and the software to be used for HMIS, and approving any changes to the HMIS Lead Agency or software
c.    Conducting outreach to and encouraging participation by all homeless assistance programs and other mainstream programs serving homeless people
d.    Developing and approving all HMIS operational agreements, policies, and procedures
e.    Working to inform elected officials, government agencies, the nonprofit community, and the public about the role and importance of HMIS and HMIS data
f.    Guiding data quality and reporting
g.    Promoting the effective use of HMIS data, including measuring the extent and nature of homelessness, the utilization of services and homeless programs over time, and the effectiveness of homeless programs
h.    Provide all local information as necessary for compilation of the CoC Bed Inventory, and support NDCHP in preparing the Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) 
 
NDCHP RESPONSIBILITIES
 
NDCHP serves as the lead agency for the HMIS project, managing and administering all HMIS operations and activities.  NDCHP exercises these responsibilities at the direction of the ND Statewide CoC Needs Assessment Committee.  These responsibilities are contingent on receipt of the appropriate HUD grant funding and local match dollars from participating jurisdictions and partner agencies and include: 
 
General Responsibilities: 
 
a.    Serving as the liaison with HUD regarding the HUD HMIS grant. 
b.    Serving as the liaison with the software vendor. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     c.  
d.  
e.  
    f.      
g. 
h.  
i. 
of non
j. funding.
I. 
 
a. 
b. 
c. 
d. 
e. 
f. 
g. 
h. 
i. 
j. 
k. 
II. 
a. 
b. 
c. 
d. 
e. 
f. 
g. 
h. 
i. 
j. 
III. 
a. 
b. 
Training:
     Attending the Needs Assessment Committee. 
Providing overall staffing for the project. 
Participating in the success of HMIS. 
Complying with applicable HUD HMIS Standards and all other applicable laws
Administer the HUD McKinney-Vento CoC Supportive Housing project grant, applying for renewal funds each year, and administering the HUD HMIS grant. 
NDCHP shall not be responsible for determining the match contribution amounts from jurisdictional and partner agencies
NDCHP shall be responsible for billing partner agencies and jurisdictions for cash match in the event -receipt of cash match funds. 
Annually prepare the HUD McKinney-Vento CoC Supportive Housing NOFA application for HMIS
 
Project Management and System Administration: 
General
Selecting and procuring server hardware
Arranging hosting and executing the hosting facility agreement
Providing domain registration
Procuring server software and licenses
Providing and managing end user licenses (per terms of grant agreement with HUD) 
Creating project forms and documentation (approved by the Needs Assessment Committee) Providing and maintaining the project website (HMIS) 
Preparing project policies and procedures (approved by the Needs Assessment Committee) and work with the Monitoring Committee to ensure compliance on behalf of and at the direction of the NDCHP Needs Assessment Committee
Working with NDCHP Needs Assessment Committee and being responsible for successful transfer/rollout of the HMIS project, including data, software vendor contract and licensing, 
security arrangements, partner agency MOUs and contractor agreements Obtaining and maintaining signed partner agency MOUs NDCHP will invoice partner agencies and jurisdictions. 
Administering the Central Server, including
Server security, configuration, and availability (we NEED to get documentation from Connecting Point regarding backup and security) 
Setup and maintenance of hardware
Installation and maintenance of software
Configuration of network and security layers
Anti-virus protection for server configuration
System backup and disaster recovery (refer to Bowman Protecting Client Data Document) 
Taking all steps needed to secure the system against breaches of security and system crashes Ensuring system uptime and monitoring system performance
Protecting of confidential data (in compliance with HUD Standards, local privacy policies, and other applicable laws), and abiding by any restrictions clients have placed on their own data Developing and implementing security and confidentiality plans   
Administering HMIS end users, including: 
Add and remove partner agency technical administrators
Manage user licenses
 
Provide all training and user guidance needed to ensure appropriate system use, data entry, data reporting, 
HMIS
 
         Policies & Procedures     Page 6
and data security and confidentiality, including: 
 
a.    Training documentation
b.    Confidentiality and Intake/Exit Forms training
c.    Application training for agency administrators and end users
d.    Outreach to users/end user support
e.    Training timetable
f.    Helpdesk
g.    NDCHP will be responsible for partner agency RSVP's to trainings and reservation and cancellation of reserved training rooms and equipment as needed.  NDCHP will provide laptop computers (up to 7) as needed.  Any additional training can be scheduled on an as needed basis and will be done online. 
 
Data Quality: 
 
a.    Ensuring all client and homeless program data are collected in adherence to the HUD HMIS Data
Standards and local additional requirements
b.    Customizing the HMIS application to meet local data requirements
c.    Monitoring data quality, generating agency exceptions reports
d.    Ensuring data quality
e.    Preparing and implementing a data quality plan
f.    Preparing and implementing a data quality monitoring plan
g.    Carrying out aggregate data extraction and reporting (under the guidance of the Needs Assessment Committee) including the HMIS data needed for an unduplicated accounting of homelessness, excluding the Point in Time and Street count. 
h.    Assist partner agencies with agency-specific data collection and reporting needs, such as the Annual
Progress Report and program reports (within reason and within constraints of budget and other duties) 
 
Satisfactory Assurances Regarding Confidentiality and Security: 
 
It is understood that NDCHP will receive client information that may be subject to the privacy and security protections and requirements of HUD HMIS Standards, HIPAA Privacy Rule, other law, and local HMIS privacy and security policies and procedures.  NDCHP hereby agrees that it will use protected client information only for purposes permitted by agreement with partner agencies and as permitted by the applicable law and Standards.  Further, NDCHP agrees it will make use of all safeguards required by HUD Privacy Standards, HIPAA Privacy Rule, where appropriate, other law, and local HMIS privacy and security policies and procedures in order to prevent any unauthorized disclosure of protected client information.   
 
PERIOD OF OPERATION  
 
PERIOD AND TERMINATION
This agreement shall remain in effect until terminated by the parties.  Each party shall have the right to terminate this agreement as to itself only upon 90 days prior written notice to the ND Statewide CoC.  Violation of any component may be grounds for immediate termination of this Agreement. 
 
AMENDMENTS
Amendments, including additions, deletions, or modifications to this MOU must be agreed to by all parties to this Agreement. 
      
 
 
SECURITY PLAN
BACKGROUND
 
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), with the Interim Rule, requires implementation of security standards.  Security standards are directed to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all HMIS information; protect against any reasonably anticipated threats or hazards to security; and ensure compliance by end users.  Written policies and procedures must comply with all applicable Federal law and regulations, and applicable state or local governmental requirements. 
 
1.    All administrative, physical, and technical safeguards shall be implemented within 6 months of initial
approval of this security plan. 
 
2.    If one or more of these standards cannot be implemented, NDCHP shall justify the implementation delay
and produce a plan of action
 
ADMINISTRATION
 
The administrative actions, policies, and procedures required to manage the selection, development, implementation, and maintenance of security measures to protect HMIS information. 
 
Security Officer:  NDCHP and each Contributing HMIS Organization (CHO) must designate an HMIS security officer to be responsible for ensuring compliance with applicable security standards.  For NDCHP, this person shall be the HMIS Database Administrator. 
 
Workforce Security:  Each CHO shall conduct background checks on the HMIS security officer and on all administrative users and submit the reports to NDCHP.  Unless otherwise required by HUD, background checks may be conducted only once for administrative users.   
 
Security awareness training and follow-up:  NDCHP shall ensure that all users receive security training prior to being given access to the HMIS, and that the training curriculum reflects the policies of the CoC and the requirements of this part.  HMIS security training is required annually. 
 
Reporting security incidents:  Security incidents as described in policies and procedures are reported to HMIS Database Administrator, then to Needs Assessment Committee and handled as in paragraph below. 
 
Disaster recovery plan:  disaster recovery plan which includes protocols for communication with staff, the CoC, and CHOs and other requirements established by HUD in notice
 
Annual security review:  NDCHP shall complete an annual security review to ensure the implementation of the security requirements for itself and CHOs.  This security review shall include completion of a security checklist ensuring that each of the security standards is implemented in accordance with the HMIS security plan
 
Contracts and other arrangements:  NDCHP shall retain copies of all contracts and agreements executed as part of the administration and management of the HMIS or required to comply with the requirements of the HMIS security standards
 
Please refer to Bowman Securing Client Data in reference to HMIS Client Information Security. 
 
PHYSICAL SAFEGUARDS
 
Access to areas containing equipment, data, and software will be secured.  All client-identifying information will be strictly safeguarded in accordance with the latest technology available.  All data will be securely protected to the maximum extent possible.  Ongoing security assessments to include penetration testing will be conducted on a regular basis. 
 
Scope: 
 
•    Server hardware physical security (Locked office) 
•    Server software security (Location Access Controls and Username accounts) 
•    Network software security (Firewall protection) 
•    Network hardware physical security (Locked office) 
•    Wire security (SSL Encryption) 
•    Client data security (Protegrity Encryption) 
 
NDCHP shall annually review and revise all physical measures, policies and procedures. 
 
TECHNICAL SAFEGUARDS
 
•    Anti-virus protection shall be installed on each workstation which is used to access the HMIS, whether accessed from the CHO or remotely from another location.  This anti-virus shall be updated at least weekly and said workstations shall be scanned for viruses at least weekly
•    All computing resources which will be used to access the HMIS will satisfy the following measures: •     will be protected at all times by a firewall
•    User access through the internet will be controlled at all times through the use of PKI (or the agreed-upon
security standard) 
 
Participating agency or a user access may be suspended or revoked for suspected or actual violation of the security protocols. 
 
•    All potential violations of any security protocols will be investigated
•    Any user found to be in violation of security protocols will be sanctioned accordingly.  Sanctions may include but are not limited to; a formal letter of reprimand, suspension of system privileges, revocation of system privileges, termination of employment and criminal prosecution
•    Any agency that is found to have consistently and/or flagrantly violated security protocols may have their access privileges suspended or revoked
•    The Needs Assessment Committee imposes all sanctions •     All sanctions can be appealed to the Needs Assessment Committee
 
NDCHP shall annually review and revise policies and agreements that protect and control access to electronic HMIS information. 
 
DATA QUALITY PLAN
INTRODUCTION
 
This section describes the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) data quality plan for the North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People (NDCHP) Continuum of Care (CoC).  The document includes data quality plan and protocols for ongoing data quality monitoring that meets requirements set forth by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).  It is developed by NDCHP (state CoC/HMIS lead agency), in coordination with the HMIS participating agencies and community service providers.  This HMIS Data Quality Plan is to be updated annually, considering the latest HMIS data standards and locally developed performance plans. 
 
 
DATA AND TECHNICAL STANDARDS
 
An HMIS is a locally administered, electronic data collection system that stores longitudinal person-level information about the men, women, and children who access homeless and other human services in a community.  Each CoC receiving HUD funding is required to implement an HMIS to capture standardized data about all persons accessing the homeless assistance system.  Furthermore, elements of HUD's annual CoC funding competition are directly related to a CoC's progress in implementing its HMIS.  In 2004, HUD published HMIS Data and Technical Standards in the Federal Register.  The Standards defined the requirements for data collection, privacy safeguards, and security controls for all local HMIS.  In March 2010, HUD published changes in the HMIS Data Standards  Revised Notice incorporating additional data collection requirements for the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) funded under revision to incorporate new privacy and technology industry standards. 
 
WHAT IS DATA QUALITY? 
Data quality is a term that refers to the reliability and validity of client-level data collected in the HMIS.  It is measured by the extent to which the client data in the system reflects actual information in the real world.  With good data quality, the CoC can “tell the story” of the population experiencing homelessness.  The quality of data is determined by assessing certain characteristics such as timeliness, completeness, and accuracy.  In order to assess data quality, a community must first think about what data quality means and document this understanding in a data quality plan. 
 
WHAT IS A DATA QUALITY PLAN? 
A data quality plan is a community-level document that facilitates the ability of the CoC to achieve statistically valid and reliable data.  A data quality plan is generally developed by the HMIS Lead Agency with input from community stakeholders and is formally adopted by the CoC.  In short, a data quality plan sets expectations for both the community and the end users to capture reliable and valid data on persons accessing the homeless assistance system. 
 
WHAT IS A DATA QUALITY MONITORING PLAN? 
A data quality monitoring plan is a set of procedures that outlines a regular, on-going process for analyzing and reporting on the reliability and validity of the data entered into the HMIS at both the program and aggregate system levels.  A data quality monitoring plan is the primary tool for tracking and generating information necessary to identify areas for data quality improvement. 
 
DETAILS AND SPECIFICATIONS
 
DATA TIMELINESS
 
Entering data in a timely manner can reduce human error that occurs when too much time has elapsed between the data collection, or service transaction, and the data entry.  The individual doing the data entry may be relying on handwritten notes or their own recall of a case management session, a service transaction, or a program exit date; therfore, the sooner the data is entered, the better chance the data will be correct.  Timely data entry also ensures that the data is accessible when it is needed, either proactively (e.g. monitoring purposes, increasing awareness, meeting funded requirements), or reactively (e.g. responding to requests for information, responding to inaccurate information). 
 
Data entry timeframe by program type (excluding weekends or holidays): 
      
•     Emergency Shelters: Universal Data Elements and Shelter Check-In/Check-Out are entered within 2 workdays of intake
    •     Transitional and Permanent Supportive Housing Programs: Universal Data Elements, Program-
Specific Data Elements and Shelter Check-In/Check-Out are entered within 7 workdays of intake
•    Rapid Re-Housing, ESG, HOPWA and Homelessness Prevention Programs: Universal and ProgramSpecific Data Elements are entered within 2 workdays of intake (eligibility established) 
•    Outreach Programs: Limited data elements entered within 3 workdays of the first outreach encounter.  Upon engagement for services, all remaining Universal Data Elements entered within 3 workdays •     Services Only Programs: Universal Data Elements are entered within 3 workdays
 
Complete and accurate data for the month must be entered into the HMIS by the fourth working day of the month following the reporting period. 
 
DATA COMPLETENESS
 
All data entered into the HMIS shall be complete.  Partially complete or missing data (e.g., missing digits(s) in a SSN, missing the year of birth, missing information on disability or veteran status) can negatively affect the ability to provide comprehensive care to clients.  Missing data could mean the client does not receive needed services – services that could help them become permanently housed and end their episode of homelessness. 
 
The Continuum of Care's goal is to collect 100% of all data elements.  However, the CoC recognizes that this may not be possible in all cases.  Therefore, the CoC has established an acceptable range of null/missing and unknown/client doesn't know/refused responses, depending on the data element and the type of program entering data. 
 
All Clients Served All programs using the HMIS shall enter data on one hundred percent (100%) of the clients they serve. 
 
Acceptable range of missing (null) and unknown (client doesn't know/refused) responses (for those projects with more than 15 clients):  
 
     TH/PSH/RRH/     HOPWA/HP     ES     ES
Data Element     Missing     Unknown     Missing     Unknown
First & Last
Name     0%     0%     0%     0% 
SSN     0%     5%     0%     5% 
Date of Birth     0%     2%     0%     2% 
Race     0%     5%     0%     5% 
Ethnicity     0%     5%     0%     5% 
Gender     0%     0%     0%     0% 
Veteran Status (Adults)     0%     5%     0%     5% 
Disabling
Condition
(Adults)     0%     5%     0%     5% 
Residence Prior to Entry     0%     0%     0%     0% 
Zip of Last
Perm. Address     0%     10%     0%     30% 
     TH/PSH/RRH/     HOPWA/HP     ES     ES
Housing Status (Entry)     0%     0%     0%     0% 
Housing Status (Exit)     0%     10%     0%     30% 
Income & 
Benefits (Entry)     0%     2%     N/A     N/A
Income & 
Benefits (Exit)     0%     10%     N/A     N/A
Add/l PDEs
(Adults;Entry)     0%     5%     N/A     N/A
Destination (Exit)     0%     10%     0%     30% 
 
 
Bed/Unit Utilization Rates
One of the primary features of an HMIS is the ability to record the number of client stays or bed nights at a homeless residential facility.  Case managers or shelter staff enter a client into the HMIS and assign them to a bed and/or a unit.  The client remains there until he or she exits the program.  When the client exits the program, they are also exited from the bed or unit in the HMIS.   
 
The formula for calculating bed utilization is: 
 
Number of Beds Occupied
Total Number of Beds
 
Acceptable range of bed/unit utilization rates for established (see below) projects is: 
•    Emergency Shelters: 75%-105% 
•    Transitional Housing: 80%-105% 
•    Permanent Supportive Housing: 85%-105% 
 
The CoC recognizes that new projects may require time to reach the projected occupancy numbers and will not expect them to meet the utilization rate requirement during the first operating year. 
 
Service-Volume Coverage Rates   
For the purpose of data quality, the service-volume coverage rate measures the level of nonlodging project participation in a CoC's HMIS.  Service-volume coverage is calculated for each HUD-defined category of dedicated homeless nonlodging projects, such as services projects, based on population.  The servicevolume coverage rate is equal to the number of persons served annually by the projects that participate in the HMIS divided by the number of persons served annually by all CoC projects within the HUD-defined category. 
 
DATA ACCURACY AND CONSISTENCY
 
Information entered into the HMIS needs to be valid, i.e. it needs to accurately represent information on the people that enter any of the homeless service programs contributing data to the HMIS.  Inaccurate data may be intentional or unintentional.  IN general, false or inaccurate information is worse than incomplete information, since with the latter, it is at least possible to acknowledge the gap.  Thus, it should be emphasized to clients and staff that it is better to enter nothing (or preferably “client doesn't know” or “refused” than to enter inaccurate information.  To ensure the most up-to-date and complete data, data entry errors should be corrected on a monthly basis. 
 
All data entered into the CoC's HMIS shall be a reflection of information provided by the client, as documented by the intake worker or otherwise updated by the client and documented for reference.  Recording inaccurate information is strictly prohibited, unless in cases when a client refuses to provide correct personal information (see below). 
 
Data consistency will ensure that data is understood, collected, and entered consistently across all programs in the HMIS.  Consistency directly affects the accuracy of data; if an end user collects all of the data, but they don't collect it in a consistent manner, then the data may not be accurate.  All data in HMIS shall be collected and entered in a common and consistent manner coross all program.  To that end, all intake and data entry workers will complete an initial training before accessing the live HMIS system.  All HMIS users must recertify their knowledge of consistency practices on an annual basis.  A basic intake form will be made available on the NDCHP website which agencies can alter to meet their additional needs, provided the base document does not change. 
 
A document that outlines the basic data elements collected on the intake form, their response categories, rationale, and definitions will be made available via the NDCHP website as a quick reference to ensure consistent data collection.  New agencies that join the CoC are required to review this document as part of the HMIS Agency Agreement execution process.   
 
MONITORING
 
The CoC recognizes that the data produced from the HMIS is critical to meet the reporting and compliance requirements of individual agencies and the CoC as a whole.  As such, all HMIS agencies are expected to meet the data quality benchmarks described in this document. 
 
To achieve this, the HMIS data will be monitored on a monthly basis to quickly identify and resolve issues that affect the timeliness, completeness, and accuracy of the data.  All monitoring will be done in accordance with the data quality monitoring plan, with full support of the CoC membership. 
 
INCENTIVES AND ENFORCEMENT
 
The purpose of monitoring is to ensure that the agreed-upon data quality benchmarks are met to the greatest possible extent and that data quality issues are quickly identified and resolved. 
 
To ensure that service providers have continued access to the expectations set forth in the data quality plan, the following protocol will be used: 
 
1.    Access to the Data Quality Plan:  The data quality plan will be posted to the CoC's public website. 
2.    Access to Data Quality Reports:  The HMIS Lead Agency will make available by the 15th of each month data quality reports for the purposes of facilitating compliance review by participating agencies and the CoC Needs Assessment Committee. 
3.    Data Correction:  Participating agencies will have 10 days to correct data.  The HMIS Lead Agency will make available by the 30th of each month revised data quality reports for posting to the CoC's public website. 
4.    Monthly Review:  The CoC Needs Assessment Committee will review participating agency data quality reports for compliance with the data quality benchmarks.  The Committee will work with participating agencies to identify training needs to improve data quality. 
5.    Public Review:  On the last day of each month, the HMIS Lead Agency will post agency aggregate data quality reports to the CoC's public website. 
6.    CoC Review:  The CoC Needs Assessment Committee will provide a brief update on progress related
to the data quality benchmarks at the monthly CoC meeting. 
 
Agencies that meet the data quality benchmarks will be periodically recognized by the CoC Needs Assessment committee. 
 
For agencies that fail to meet the data quality benchmarks, the CoC may ask the agency to submit a written plan that details how they will take corrective action.  The plan will be submitted to, and monitored by, the CoC Executive Committee.  Should the problem persist, the Executive Committee may make a recommendation to suspend the agency's ability to enter data into the HMIS, and will contact any appropriate state and federal funders. 
 
DISASTER RECOVERY PLAN
Risk      Description/ 
Remarks     Probability     Impact
     Preventive/ Mitigation Measures     Actions If Occurs
 
FUNDING                     
Funding
Cuts (<20%)     Cut to HUD grant     Med     Med     Foster additional funding, create rainy day fund     Limit scope, extend timelines  
Funding Cuts (>20%)     Loss or severe cuts of a primary grants     Low     High     Maintain strong relationships with funders, meet deliverables      Implement agency fee structure model; staff cut back
 
STAFFING                     
Key Staff
Loss or
Long
Absence     PM or
Database
Admin. (New
Job, 
Maternity, 
Military)     High     Med     Cross-train staff in each other’s jobs; document all activities; maintain job
descriptions     Immediate job posting; 
knowledge
transfer; 
redistribute work (limit scope, extend timelines) 
 
VENDORS                     
HMIS
Vendor Out of Business      Lack of business, or boom/bust pattern     Low     High     Keep software code in escrow; maintain alternate access to database     Communicate with community and other vendor clients, prioritize new software selection
Third Party Vendor Out of Business       E.g., 
Encryption, 
Hosting, 
Reporting, 
Off-site
Backup  
Storage     Med     Low     Maintain lists of alternate vendors; avoid tying community policies to specific vendor services; establish temporary workarounds     Implement temporary workarounds; seek alternative vendor (or set timeline for primary vendor to find solution) 
Long-term compounde d problems with HMIS Vendor     Continuing problems with e.g., speed, reporting, and     Low     High     Document issues and speed and success of responses; maintain
clear public distinction between HMIS project     Issue specific deadline to vendors; explore options prior to 

Risk      Description/ 
Remarks     Probability     Impact
     Preventive/ Mitigation Measures     Actions If Occurs
    access over a year plus             and software; establish vendor obligations and procedures for changing vendors in original contract (e.g., access to data; conversion assistance; contract termination rights)     deadline to be ready for failure.  
Outline complete timetable of software selection, training and rollout process; 
expect roadblocks. Gather input from Advisory/ Governing committee on decision of whether to seek new software. 
 
SOFTWARE                 
Software
Page Load
Consistently
Longer
Than One
Minute
     Consistently slow, or slowing as more users records added     High     Med     Test under “load” conditions; add new users incrementally; monitor speed regularly; upgrade hardware periodically     Inform vendor immediately; determine if problem local or system-wide; if applicable, curtail use and timing of highresource functions, inform users of best times to use.  Vendor usually
recommends
solution
Software Functionalit y Impacts Goals      Promised
functionality not delivered: community
disillusioned, goal not achieved     Low     High     Manage community expectations; tie software contract to functionality; prioritize mission-critical issues     Determine with community
highest-priority issues, negotiate with vendor strict deadlines for
fixes tied to payments; publish timelines.  Train community on
“tricks” and workarounds. 
 
INFORMATION SECURITY                 
Hardware
Failure/ 
Disasters      Server crash; natural disasters (hurricane,     Med     High     Invest in backup, offsite storage, and server replication services     Implement backup plan, inform community as 

Risk      Description/ 
Remarks     Probability     Impact
     Preventive/ Mitigation Measures     Actions If Occurs
    blackout, fire, etc.)                 necessary – 
Connecting Point  
External
Security
Breach      Unauthorized user hacks into system     Med     High     Audit security protocols regularly; establish relationship with security expert to be on-call emergency     Shut down all access points to database; determine how the breach occurred, and fix immediately
 
Breach by
Authorized
User     Client level data used or given out inappropriatel y     Med     Med     Audit privacy procedures regularly; emphasize privacy issues in user training; establish clear jobrelated consequences for breach culminating with termination.     Determine responsible party; remove system access to party and begin job action.  
 
COMMUNITY/POLITICAL
CoC
Executive
Level
Changes to Nonsupporter     CoC Execs no longer
actively supports PM, project     Low     Med     Keep executives aware of project status, benefits, and national mandates; publicize successes broadly; meet with any new executives soon after start date.     Mobilize support from project
allies, including Executive
Directors, and HUD regional and national officials. 
Emphasize local benefits, federal funding, 
momentum to
date  
Resistance at
Caseworker or Agency Levels     Unwillingness to enter date     Low     Med     Emphasize long-term
operational advantages; use executive champion     Re-prioritize rollout to other agencies that are most enthusiastic; build record of success.  
Domestic
Violence
Political  
Challenges     Anti-HMIS interest groups (e.g., DV) protest, generate negative press     Low     Low     Review and document security protocols; keep potentially negative groups involved in decisionmaking; proactive press strategy; know talking points for press     Do not threaten to cut funding (generates more negative press); 
hold meetings with all interested parties; take full advantage of leniencies offered by HUD Regulations
Risk      Description/ 
Remarks     Probability     Impact
     Preventive/ Mitigation Measures     Actions If Occurs
 
LEGAL/COMPLIANCE                 
New HUD Requiremen
ts     New data
collection, reporting, or security rules     High     Med     Build HUD compliance into vendor contracts     Distinguish rules applicable to vendor, community, agency; 
determine actual HUD- compliance deadlines and consequences; change scope
and timelines to compensate
HIPAA
Challenges     HIPAA covered agencies refuse participation     Low     Med     Learn about basics of who is covered by HIPAA, and
relationship between HIPAA and HMIS regs.     Engage legal consultant; ensure documents are appropriately drafted
 
DATA/PARTICIPATION                 
Data Quality or Coverage Problems     Inability to report on data or data not reliable     Low     Med     Establish communitywide standards for data release; consider data quality and coverage potential in roll out; monitor data quality regularly and report back to agencies and users; acknowledge data
quality leaders in community     Inform users and supervisors of consistent data
quality problems; review ways to improve input process (e.g., better screens); acknowledge
limitations of all data released
 
 
APPENDIX
BACKUP AND ANTI-VIRUS SUMMARY
ND Coalition for the Homeless is currently subscribed to Connecting Point’s Dakota Backup service.  This service performs backups nightly that are stored on a remote server based in Minneapolis MN.  These backups will keep 7 generations of data so that if a file is changed it will keep up to seven copies of the file.  If the file is deleted from the server the file will be stored with Dakota Backup for 30 days.  Test restores have been performed so that the ability to restore lost data has been verified. 
They are also using the Symantec Endpoint Protection for their antivirus software, this software is updated daily and is scheduled to run an automatic scan of the server every week.  The Symantec Software also has a service called Proactive Threat Protection that scans all files that are being downloaded to the server in real time to help prevent infections.       
BOWMAN SYSTEMS DATA SECURITY
ACCESS SECURITY
 
Access Security begins at Bowman Systems with a focus on the following areas: 
 
•    Bowman Systems Employees
•    Bowman Systems Access to ServicePoint
•    Audit Trails
•    Customer Access to ServicePoint. 
 
Bowman Systems Employees
 
Bowman Systems' designated Security Officer assures employees are held to the highest standards when it comes to both company and customer data security. Employees who have access to client data are subject to a national background check, training on confidentiality requirements (company, HIPAA, HUD), and must sign a confidentiality statement as part of their employee agreement. 
 
Bowman Systems Access to ServicePoint
 
Only a limited number of Bowman Systems' staff has access to a customer's ServicePoint site and client data. Access occurs only when you request an installation, import of data, implementation upgrade, or require assistance by support staff to troubleshoot a problem.The contract between the customer and Bowman Systems legally compels Bowman Systems to hold all client data stored in the customer's database in strict confidence. Bowman Systems will take all reasonable precautions to prevent the disclosure to outside parties of such information, except as may be necessary by reason of legal, accounting, or regulatory requirements. Access to the customer's system data by Bowman Systems support staff can be monitored by running an Audit Report (see Automated Audit Trail below). 
 
Audit Trail
 
ServicePoint automatically tracks caller, client, and resource related activity by the use of an audit trail. This system function logs the time and type of activity, as well as the name of the user who viewed, added, edited, or deleted the information. All changes to Resource records are automatically tracked by the User (updates, as well as, date and time the updates were made). In addition, there is a Date of Official Update that is set when the Resource record has been formally reviewed. This section includes not only date and time of the Official update but also which User performed the action, which organization requested the Official Update, and a notes field for describing the reason for the update (such as Annual Review, Agency
Request, etc). • To retrieve information created by the audit trail, an Audit report can be generated in the Reporting section of ServicePoint. Access to client audit information is limited to System Administrator and Agency Administrator access levels. 
 
Customer Access to ServicePoint
 
To ensure authorized access, each user is issued a user name and password for entrance into the ServicePoint application. 
 
•    Each ServicePoint user is required to have a unique User ID to log into the application. 
•    Passwords must be 8 to 16 characters in length and must contain at least two numbers. 
•    The system allows only one login per password at a time. A user cannot log into the system on two terminals at the same time using a single password. 
•    Passwords automatically expire every 45 days requiring the user to create a new password. 
•    A prompt appears when you need to choose a new password. 
•    The same password cannot be used consecutively. 
•    To enforce password security, ServicePoint will not allow a browser to save a password. In addition, if FOUR consecutive logon attempts with the incorrect password are made the user account will need to be reset by your System Administrator. This security feature prevents access to the site by a password generator. 
•    Passwords are stored as hashed values in the ServicePoint database ServicePoint has an automatic logout function for users who have been idle for a pre-determined period. (The default setting is 30 minutes.) This function decreases potential viewing and/or manipulation of client data by unauthorized individuals. Although the default setting is 30 Bowman Systems Securing Client Data Page 4 2012.Jul.25 minutes, each installation can request Bowman Systems to set the system timeout for a length that meets their particular policies and procedures. To limit who can view and/or modify the customer's client data, individuals are assigned one of seventeen (17) User Access Levels. Each user level has certain security restrictions applied to it. Each user level has access to certain ServicePoint features and the ability to view certain pieces of client information. The System Administrators II can see all data, even when it is closed. 
•    Each level grants different access rights and abilities to the various sections (ClientPoint, ResourcePoint, SkanPoint, ShelterPoint, Admin etc.) of the application. 
 
SITE SECURITY
 
Site security is a high priority since it not only helps protect the customer's stored client data, but also protects the equipment used to host the customer's data. To ensure the protection and service reliability for the customer's system, Bowman Systems has instituted the following security levels: 
 
BUILDING SECURITY
 
Bowman Systems' offices are located in a large commercial complex with the following perimeter security systems: 
•    24-hour security personnel •     24-hour video surveillance
•    Building fire suppression system
•    After-hours Key Card entry to building •     After-hours Key Card elevator access
•    Locked stairwells during non-business hours. 
 
BOWMAN SYSTEMS HEADQUARTERS SECURITY
 
The Bowman Systems offices and data centers include the following additional levels of security. 
•    After-hours key entry to offices
•    Dedicated and secured Data Center
•    Locked down 24-hours per day
•    Two separate, fully redundant HVAC systems for server areas
•    Only accessible by management controlled key
•    Protected by a state of the art, non-liquid automatic fire suppression system
•    No access is permitted to the office cleaning staff
•    Accessed by key personnel only (e.g. Information Technology and Management staff). 
•    Access is required for nightly data backups, new installations, upgrades and maintenance. 
 
NETWORK SECURITY
 
Database security includes protection of client data residing on the database server and as it is transmitted over the internet through the application server. The security measures in place ensure that client data is only available and accessed by authorized users.There is a nightly backup of the ServicePoint system that is comprised of a backup of the database and a backup of the application code. Our standard protocol includes nightly tape backup of the client's database that is carried three miles off-site and stored in a fireproof facility. Bowman Systems maintains redundant power for all on-site servers via building power and building generator and redundant bandwidth provided via two separate upstream providers. Our data center contains a state-of-the-art, nondestructive fire-suppression system. Bowman Systems also utilizes RAID technologies (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) to mirror the hard drives, provide faster data throughput and ensure reliable data. 
 
•    Multiple broadband connections, fully load balanced for reliability and speed. 
•    Reliable Enterprise class Cisco switches and routing equipment. 
•    A natural gas powered generator capable of powering the facility indefinitely and UPS backups to supply uninterrupted power and prevent power surges that may damage equipment. This system is tested monthly (in such a way that power is not interrupted) to ensure reliability. •     Two separate, fully redundant HVAC systems for server areas •     A non-liquid automatic fire control system. 
•    A physically secure building with keycard access, video surveillance and 24 x 7 security guard controlled access. 
 
DATA SECURITY
 
To ensure availability of customer data in the event of system failure or malicious access, redundant records are created and stored in the following manner: 
 
•    Nightly database tape backups. • Offsite storage of tape backups
•    7 day backup history stored locally on instantly accessible Raid 10 storage
•    24 hours backed up locally on instantly-accessible disk storage
•    1 month backup history stored off site
•    24 x 7 access to Bowman Systems emergency line to provide assistance related to “outages” or“downtime”. 
 
FIREWALLS
 
To enhance security further, firewalls are in place on all servers hosted by Bowman Systems. As detailed below, there are multiple levels of firewall security: 
 
•    The ServicePoint application and database servers are separate from the Bowman Systems internal network. 
•    Bowman Systems utilizes an industry standard Intrusion Detection System to pinpoint unauthorized attempts at accessing its network and to shield the customer’s data in the event of such an attempt. 
•    Only regular and secured HTTP traffic are permitted through to the Bowman Systems application servers. 
•    Only regular and secured HTTP reply traffic is allowed from the Bowman Systems application servers. 
•    Outgoing access to the web from the production network is prohibited. 
•    As a security policy, specifics on the type of equipment, protocols, and procedures in use are never revealed. 
•    Database servers are only accessible via an internal network connection from our application servers. 
 
ENCRYPTION
 
Likewise, the following levels of encryption are available, as needed: 
 
SSL Encryption
SSL encryption ONLY encrypts the data going across the internet to the end-user's web browser. Bowman
Systems uses AES-256 encryption (Advanced Encryption Standard, 256-bit) in conjunction with RSA
2048-bit key lengths. A description can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_size. When an enduser accesses their site, an SSL (encrypted) negotiation is performed between the server at Bowman Systems datacenter and the end user's web browser. The traffic that then flows between the server and the end user’s workstation is encrypted using the SSL certificate installed on that server. This prevents anyone that is sitting in between our server here and the end user's workstation from being able to intercept potentially sensitive data. The AES-256 is the method in which the data is encrypted. There are various forms of SSL encryption. The key length make it more difficult to decrypt the encrypted data. 
 Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) (Optional) 
As an option, Private Key Infrastructure (PKI) is available for those needing additional security frameworks. PKI is an additional layer of security on TOP of our standard SSL certificates. It is still SSL encrypted, however, this method of encryption requires a matching server certificate / client certificate pair in order to decrypt the data that is sent from the end user’s Servicepoint site to their Web Browser. Without the appropriate PKI client certificate installed on the end-user's workstation, their web browser will not be able to decrypt the data and therefore will not be able to access the site. The PKI Client Certificate cannot be installed on a workstation without the appropriate password that accompanies the certificate. This allows the customer to regulate exactly who can and who cannot access their Servicepoint site. 
 
Database Encryption (Optional) 
The data in ServicePoint encrypted databases are encrypted with AES-128. 
 
DISASTER RECEOVERY
 
Due to the nature of technology, unforeseen service outages may occur. In order to assure service reliability for hosted ServicePoint applications, Bowman Systems offers the following disaster recovery options. 
 
Basic Disaster Recovery Plan
The basic Disaster Recovery Plan is included in the standard ServicePoint contract and includes the following: 
 
•    Nightly database tape backups. •     Offsite storage of tape backups
•    7 day backup history stored locally on instantly accessible Raid 10 storage
•    1 month backup history stored off site
•    24 x 7 access to Bowman Systems emergency line to provide assistance related to “outages” or
“downtime”. 
•    24 hours backed up locally on instantly-accessible disk storage
 
Standard Recovery: All customer site databases are stored online, and are readily accessible for approximately 24 hours; tape backups are kept for approximately one (1) month. Upon recognition of a system failure, a site can be copied to a standby server, and a database can be restored, and site recreated within three (3) to four (4) hours if online backups are accessible. As a rule, a tape restoration can be made within six (6) to eight (8) hours. On-site backups are made once daily and a restore of this backup may incur some data loss between when the backup was made and when the system failure occurred. 
 
All internal servers are configured in hot-swappable hard drive RAID configurations. All systems are configured with hot-swappable redundant power supply units. Our Internet connectivity is comprised of a primary and secondary connection with separate internet service providers to ensure redundancy in the event of an ISP connectivity outage. The primary Core routers are configured with redundant power supplies, and are configured in tandem so that if one core router fails the secondary router will continue operation with little to no interruption in service. All servers, network devices, and related hardware are powered via APC Battery Backup units that in turn are all connected to electrical circuits that are connected to a building generator. 
 
All client data is backed-up online and stored on a central file server repository for 24 hours. Each night a tape backup is made of these client databases and secured in a bank vault. 
 
Historical data can be restored from tape as long as the data requested is 30 days or newer. As a rule, the data can be restored to a standby server within 6-8 hours without affecting the current live site. Data can then be selectively queried and/or restored to the live site. 
 
For power outage, our systems are backed up via APC battery back-up units, which are also in turn connected via generator-backed up electrical circuits. For a system crash, Non-Premium Disaster Recovery Customers can expect six (6) to eight (8) hours before a system restore with potential for some small data loss (data that was entered between the last backup and when the failure occurred) if a tape restore is necessary. If the failure is not hard drive related these times will possibly be much less since the drives themselves can be repopulated into a standby server. 
 
All major outages are immediately brought to the attention of executive management. Bowman Systems support staff helps manage communication or messaging to customers as progress is made to address the service outage. Bowman Systems takes major outages seriously, understands, and appreciates that the customer becomes a tool and utility for daily activity and client service workflow.  
 
Premium Disaster Recovery Plan (Optional) 
The optional Premium Disaster Recovery plan includes all of the Basic Plan features plus several additional levels of support to enhance disaster recovery capability. Additional features included are as follows: 
 
•    Off site, out-of state, on a different Internet provider and on a separate electrical grid backups of the application server via a secured Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection
•    Near-Instantaneous backups of application site (no files older than 5 minutes) •     Nightly off site replication of database in case of a primary data center failure
•    Priority level response (ensures downtime will not exceed 4 hours) 
 
HIPAA COMPLIANCE
 
HIPAA compliance is a requirement for many agencies that use ServicePoint, particularly as the compliance relates to the HIPAA standards for security. The following five (5) methods ensure that ServicePoint is fully compliant with HIPAA data center standards: 
 
•    Network Security includes firewalls, certification servers, VPN access, and Operating System authentication. 
•    Database Encryption (optional – pricing is available upon request) is a database level security which encrypts confidential information located in the database tables. 
•    Audit Trails log and report on users who have viewed, updated, or deleted client records. 
•    Client Record Privacy Options allow or restrict access to all or part of a client file, including individual fields (data level). 
•    Automatic timeout logs a user out of the system after a specified period, thereby decreasing the potential viewing or manipulation of client data by unauthorized individuals. 
 
UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS
 
If an unauthorized entity were to gain access to a customer's system and client data or if there were suspicion of probable access, Bowman Systems would take the following steps: 
 
•    The system would be examined to determine the presence of system or data corruption. 
•    If the system has been compromised, the system would be taken offline. 
•    Using the previous night's backup, a restored copy of the system data would be loaded onto another server, and the system brought back on line with the back-up data. 
 

 
• 
• 
•     o o     Comparing the back-up database to the database taken offline, an investigation would be determine the extent of the unauthorized activity/corruption, and the corrective action needed. Upon completion of the investigation, findings would be reported to the customer and options be discussed. 
Upon customer approval, corrective action would be initiated. Corrective action could include all part of the following: 
The original hard drive would be completely erased and rebuilt, including a new operating SSL Certificate, application(s), and the back-up database. 
If applicable and feasible, lost data from the original database would be restored.     launched to would
 or  system, 
HMIS
 
         Policies & Procedures     Page 23
Summary Report for  ND-500 - North Dakota Statewide CoC
Measure 1: Length of Time Persons Remain Homeless
This measures the number of clients active in the report date range across ES, SH (Metric 1.1) and then ES, SH and TH (Metric 1.2) along with their average and median length of time homeless. This includes time homeless during the report date range as well as prior to the report start date, going back no further than October, 1, 2012.
Metric 1.1: Change in the average and median length of time persons are homeless in ES and SH projects. Metric 1.2: Change in the average and median length of time persons are homeless in ES, SH, and TH projects.
a.    This measure is of the client’s entry, exit, and bed night dates strictly as entered in the HMIS system.
 
b.    Due to changes in DS Element 3.17, metrics for measure (b) will not be reported in 2016.
This measure includes data from each client’s “Length of Time on Street, in an Emergency Shelter, or Safe Haven” (Data Standards element 3.17) response and prepends this answer to the client’s entry date effectively extending the client’s entry date backward in time. This “adjusted entry date” is then used in the calculations just as if it were the client’s actual entry date.
 
Measure 2: The Extent to which Persons who Exit Homelessness to Permanent Housing Destinations Return to Homelessness
This measures clients who exited SO, ES, TH, SH or PH to a permanent housing destination in the date range two years prior to the report date range. Of those clients, the measure reports on how many of them returned to homelessness as indicated in the HMIS for up to two years after their initial exit.
 
Measure 3: Number of Homeless Persons
Metric 3.1 – Change in PIT Counts
This measures the change in PIT counts of sheltered and unsheltered homeless person as reported on the PIT (not from HMIS).
 
Metric 3.2 – Change in Annual Counts
This measures the change in annual counts of sheltered homeless persons in HMIS.
 
Measure 4: Employment and Income Growth for Homeless Persons in CoC Program-funded Projects
Metric 4.1 – Change in earned income for adult system stayers during the reporting period Metric 4.2 – Change in non-employment cash income for adult system stayers during the reporting period
 
Metric 4.3 – Change in total income for adult system stayers during the reporting period
 
Metric 4.4 – Change in earned income for adult system leavers
 
Metric 4.5 – Change in non-employment cash income for adult system leavers
 
Metric 4.6 – Change in total income for adult system leavers
Measure 5: Number of persons who become homeless for the 1st time
Metric 5.1 – Change in the number of persons entering ES, SH, and TH projects with no prior enrollments in HMIS
 
Metric 5.2 – Change in the number of persons entering ES, SH, TH, and PH projects with no prior enrollments in HMIS
 
Measure 6: Homeless Prevention and Housing Placement of Persons de ined by category 3 of HUD’s Homeless De inition in CoC Programfunded Projects
This Measure is not applicable to CoCs in 2016.
Measure 7: Successful Placement from Street Outreach and Successful Placement in or Retention of Permanent Housing
Metric 7a.1 – Change in exits to permanent housing destinations
 
Metric 7b.1 – Change in exits to permanent housing destinations
 
Metric 7b.2 – Change in exit to or retention of permanent housing